Batteries Energizr-220-2

Published on March 23rd, 2016 | by Jake Richardson

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Solar + Residential Energy Storage System Launched By JLM Energy

March 23rd, 2016 by  

California-based JLM Energy has launched a new solar power and residential energy storage system which uses Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) batteries to work with the solar array. Proprietary software helps manage the system for effective energy efficiency, and a mobile app is available as well, which can remotely control devices such as thermostats and HVAC systems. CEO and Founder Farid Dibachi answered some questions about the Energizr 200.

Energizr-220-2

What is the solar power capacity and energy storage capacity? For energy storage what is the kilowatt or megawatt hours?

Energizr 200 has a solar power capacity ranging from 3.8 kW to 8.2 kW and energy storage capacity ranging from 5.2 kWh to 20.8 kWh in increments of 2.6 kWh.

Our largest installation, in a very large home in CA, will be using 4 of the 20.8 kWh units. However, an average 2,000 to 2,500 sq ft house will use a system with 10.4 kWh capacity for demand shaving, time-of-use or self-consumption applications.

How many lifetime cycles for the energy storage?

Our batteries have a life cycle of 5,000 cycles and are projected to last 15 to 17 years for a typical demand shaving application.

What is the cost?

Using JLM’s patent-pending, Symmetric DC Regulation technology, our customers gain a substantial cost advantage by combining solar and energy storage.

For a 2,500 square foot house, a typical 5 kW solar system, integrated with 10.4 kWh battery, together with smart thermostats and load control, costs as low as $18,000 after the incentives. This includes installation costs.

By design, Energizr-200 systems’ batteries are charged strictly from solar and therefore the entire system qualifies for the 30% federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC).

In CA, Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) provides as much as 50% of the installed system cost.

Is the product modular? Can Energizr 200s be stacked together?

Energizr 200 is a modular unit and is field up-gradable. For example, the 5.2 kWh system can be field upgraded to a 20.8 kWh. In addition, complete Energizr 200 systems can be placed in parallel to fit any home or lifestyle.

Does it come with an inverter?

Yes, Energizr 200 uses a Fronius Inverter. Other inverter types are under development.

What is the warranty?

JLM warranties the entire system, including the batteries, for 10 years and provides a way for customers to receive a lifetime warranty in exchange for a small monthly O&M fee.

What is the product contained in, and can it be stored outdoors or should it be placed inside?

Energizr-200 is rated at NEMA-3R and is suitable for indoor and outdoor installation.

What is the installation procedure and who is qualified to do it?

We have a team of licensed electricians working directly for JLM who are based in California, Arizona, Nevada, and Hawaii. We also work with a network of more than 260 dealers and partners who have their own licensed electricians that perform installations.

What is the installation cost?

Installation cost is included in the product cost. However, we project that installation takes less than 4 hours of labor and in most cases could be completed in less than one day.

What are the product’s dimensions and weight?

Energizr 200 is 55″x32″x9″. The weight of the 20.8 kWh model is 775 lbs. and is designed to be wall-mounted.

You have sold some units to utilities. What are they using them for?

JLM’s Energizr-200 is the first product of its kind integrating solar and energy storage. The units are installed in homes by utilities to understand the impact of residential behind-the-meter energy storage on the utility’s grid and the customers’ monthly bill. This is important as the utilities assess the various approaches to the net energy metering. In addition to energy storage, the utility will experiment with smart thermostats and load control units that are integral parts of JLM’s Energizr-200 product ecosystem.

What kind of organizations or people are the early adopters?

Early adopters are interested in having choice and control over their power bill and are aware of the fact that energy technologies, combining solar, storage, smart thermostats and load control systems are emerging technologies that are bound to bring the desired level of control and choice to them. They are more often than not tech-savvy and anxious to participate as front-runners in the technology changes that bring about social change.

Image Credit: JLM Energy

 
 
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  • Charlotte Omoto

    I asked JLM why they wouldn’t pursue UL listing for the Zefrz wind turbines. No response. In fact, an article on this site prompted me to get the system. I wonder if JLM is actively getting Cleantechnica to feature them on this site.

    • vensonata

      Residential teeny “wind turbines” are just a bad idea from the get go. The physics just doesn’t work…and that makes their ethics dubious. However the ceo is a mechanical and electrical engineer and batteries are not exactly rocket science. So he puts together a package…and it is not much different than competitors so nothing to get excited about here. The only interesting aspect is the ITC and the SGIP.

    • Bob_Wallace

      I’m pretty sure that if any money was exchanging hands it would be stated very clearly that this is a sponsored article.

    • Bob_Wallace

      I’m pretty sure that if any money was exchanging hands it would be stated very clearly that this is a sponsored article.

  • Steve M

    Currently have a grid tied PV system with net metering as the solar energy storage system. Is it feasible to install a stand alone storage system and maintain current system?

  • J.H.

    Would you be better off spending the money, having Mobil Storage ( a new Bolt) vs. stationary back up storage (JLM)

  • Charlotte Omoto

    I couldn’t find any information about certification or UL listing for the Energizr 200. The Zefrz turbine they sell is still listed as seeking UL listing, but they have abandoned getting UL listing.

  • J.H.

    Are they UL rated ?

  • ROBwithaB

    It would seem that as Tesla Motors is to the EV revolution, Tesla Energy is to the the storage revolution.
    Suddenly we have everyone and his dog able to offer a functional, affordable consumer product. Where were all these people 24 months ago?

  • Steve

    Don’t blow off the install cost, people–tax payer subsidized. This is not free money. Negotiate like you are paying 100% of the install price out of pocket. $100 /hour x 4, for a qualified electrician to do the install.

  • GCO

    775 lbs. and designed to be wall-mounted.

    Ouch.

    • Ronald Brakels

      We’re going to need a bigger wall.

    • Bob_Wallace

      Some wrong thinking apparently happened along the way. 775 pounds would likely pull most studs down. Just moving the beast into the house and jacking it up would be a major problem.

      Put it on an interior wall and the floor under the wall would probably sag. I put a short foundation and stub wall underneath my floor where the ~400 pound wood stove was going.

  • Charlotte Omoto

    I purchased JLM Energy’s Zefr wind turbines, and half of the rotors fell off in 25 mph wind within a week of installation. They replaced them with “upgraded rotors”, but I think what they initially sent were defective. They also claimed “The turbine and generator assembly is currently be tested for UL listing.” but actually has decided not to get UL listing which is required in my state, so I had to pay to get field engineer certification. They company has not been very responsive so I would be very leery of getting their system.

    • vensonata

      Very interesting. Yes, we must keep alert for scam companies. It would be unfortunate if JLM were one of “those”.

    • J.H.

      Is this storage wall system UL rated ?

    • Matt

      Any electric generation equipment that does not have (can’t get?) UL listing should be considered experimental at best. Ask yourself why they skip UL listing?

      • Charlotte Omoto

        I asked JLM why they wouldn’t pursue UL listing since that is what they said on their website. No response. In fact, an article on this site prompted me to get the system. I wonder if JLM is actively getting Cleantechnica to feature them on this site.

  • vensonata

    “Our largest installation, in a very large home in CA, will be using 4 of the 20.8 kWh units.” It is interesting to speculate on what appears to be an inevitable trend to residential solar with storage. Who will be the first customers? I think the wealthy. It seems to appeal to them to be virtually or really independent of the grid. Certainly in third world countries where the grid is spotty the wealthy have their own electrical supply, usually a generator. But I have seen half a dozen articles on high end houses in the U.S. going with massive PV and battery banks…because…they can.

  • Marion Meads

    Doing the math, the original price before incentives is $25,714, assuming the 30% tax credit is the only incentive. That would be $5.14/Watt with batteries and installation included!!! They should wipe out SolarCity whose pricing is at $5.10/Watt without batteries.

    This is too good to be true…

    • vensonata

      We need to reverse engineer the math Marion. If the 5 kw system with a 10 kw

      battery is $18,000 that is $3.60 watt complete. Now that is equivalent to just PV and as if the battery etc is thrown in for free. It is the SGIP that is a bit mysterious. 50% of what is covered? The battery? or the whole system? It must be just the battery. If the battery is say $7000 then half that is $3500.
      So the PV and inverter is $14,500 after ITC and the battery is $3500 after the SGIP.

      The whole package is a great deal…that is, for the U.S. market. The Australians are getting the same thing for approximately $11,000 USD. (See the discussion on a previous battery comparison chart article from Australia yesterday on CT.)

      • Marion Meads

        The math is in fact very simple no complicated reasoning with too many baggage of assumptions, live and learn:

        Price Before Incentives = Price After incentives/(100% – % tax credits).

        Assuming that the tax credits are the only incentives.

        From the article:
        “For a 2,500 square foot house, a typical 5 kW solar system, integrated with 10.4 kWh battery, together with smart thermostats and load control, costs as low as $18,000 after the incentives. This includes installation costs. “

        • vensonata

          Yes, yes, I got that, and appreciate your math. I was just wanting to add in the SGIP. After all, between the two of these incentives things are starting to look very positive for storage aren’t they?

      • Matt

        “In CA, Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) provides as much as 50% of the installed system cost”
        -So SGIP looks like in cover system and installation. But is it just PV, just battery, or both?
        If both then that would be a total savings of 80%.
        If total is $14500 (battery $7000).
        If SGIP on all save $11600
        If SGIP only battery save (4350 + 3500) = $7850

  • Dan

    I may have a new job at a local solar installation business in Illinois! The phone interview went great and we chatted away about policy and the industry. Thanks to this types of articles I felt like I had some idea of what I was talking about. The business owner said he wasn’t installing batteries, only rooftop solar, so hopefully we keep seeing developments in the storage hardware, software, and policy realms and I’ll be able to stay on the cutting edge of the energy industry. He’s going to get back to me about a potential installation job next week. Woohooooo, I’m psyched! Meanwhile, I plan to be studying Khan Academy’s Electrical Engineering course and preparing to become a licensed electrician when I have the opportunity. So far that course is amazing and very detailed. Check out Khan Academy for pretty much any of the STEM fields. They have lots of math courses… which I need to spend more time with!

    • Frank

      Good luck to you. Besides this Fronius inverter, Solar Edge is coming out with a StorEdge inverter. I just heard of SMA announcing something. Xantrex and Outback both have battery inverters. There is a lot of activity with these inverters, and the last couple all mention accomodating lithium chemistries.

      • Dan

        I appreciate those leads. I’m learning anywhere I can. The electrical engineering course on Khan Academy has a ton of stuff I need to soak up. Specific products and businesses like these are good for me to get familiar with. When we are not installing pv on roofs, I may have opportunities in sales at some point, where this type of info will really come in handy. Solar Power to the People! I’m so excited for my first day…lol

  • Ivor O’Connor

    In CA, Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) provides as much as 50% of the installed system cost.

    This needs an article!

    • vensonata

      Yes indeed. All of this was very interesting. But what caught my eye was:
      “By design, Energizr-200 systems’ batteries are charged strictly from solar and therefore the entire system qualifies for the 30% federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC). In CA, Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) provides as much as 50% of the installed system cost.”
      That is the confirmation of subsidies I have been inquiring about. And the detail that as long as the battery is exclusively supplied by solar electricity it qualifies for the ITC is important. The SGIP incentive is California at its best. This is finally an affordable and adequate self storage system, congratulations. And look for comparable Tesla installations with the same ITC and SGIP benefits arriving

      • Actually this ITC is a bit complicated but quite clearly defined now for battery systems. For battery systems 100% charged by solar full 30% credit can be taken. For between 100% and 75% prorated credit applies based on % solar charge in full year in terms of kWh. So for 90% solar and 10% grid, 90% of 30% will be available. But below the 75% cliff nothing is available. These charging ratios have to be maintained for 5 years or else tax credit claimed in earlier year will have to relinquished in following years.

        http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/02/when-is-energy-storage-eligible-for-the-30-percent-itc.html

        • vensonata

          Thanks, this has been a mysterious issue. But this fact of the ITC applying to home storage changes everything. Do you know any more about the SGIP? Because if both apply to a battery it suddenly drops in price by 30% + 50% =80%(?). That would make a Telsa powerwall under $1000. In fact I would consider the 100kwh powerpack which has a full price of $25,000 now reduced to…what?…$9000? That is $90 kwh!

          • ROBwithaB

            If that is indeed the case, expect to hear a LOT of bleating in the LA Times about Elon sucking at the subsidy tit.

          • vensonata

            I will join him if there is a spare tit.

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