Cars image-15-e1458628233159

Published on March 23rd, 2016 | by James Ayre

11

EV Sales In Canada Increased By 32% In 2015, Tesla Sales Increased 137%

March 23rd, 2016 by  

Originally published on EV Obsession.

Electric vehicle sales saw a year-on-year increase of around 32% in Canada in 2015 — with total sales numbers rising to 6,933 from 5,235 in 2014 — according to the latest figures from EV Volumes.

These numbers mean that while the Canadian electric vehicle market — inclusive of both all-electric (EV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) offerings — didn’t grow as rapidly as the Chinese and European ones did, it also didn’t contract like the US one did.

image-15-e1458628233159

Interestingly, while the overall market only grew 32%, Tesla Model S sales actually grew 137%, similar to the trend seen in the US market where Tesla’s growth completely eclipsed that of other manufacturers.

Also worth noting, in Canada the lack of offerings worked to the advantage of Nissan and Chevy. Both the Nissan LEAF and the Chevy Volt managed to maintain a higher market share in Canada than elsewhere during the year thanks to the dearth of new competition.

EV Volumes provides more:

Canada sales increased from 5235 to 6933 Plug-ins and the pace was particularly strong in Q4 with 84% volume increase vs Q4 of 2014. January and February 2016 showed few signs of “hangovers” from possible year-end campaigns; 22% rsp. 61% more plug-ins were delivered. The new Volt has a large part in this development and it’s back for the pole position in 2016.

Market share, as % of the Canadian light vehicle market, is still low. It increased from 0.28% in 2014 to 0.37% in 2015, rank 20 among over 40 markets we are tracking. Plug-in vehicles have a short history in Canada and their population was only around 18,500 at the end of February.

image-18

The Chevy Volt is responsible for a huge portion of the overall PHEV market share in the country, so the quarterly changes seen illustrated in the image above are largely down to changes in Volt sales. The introduction of the next-generation Volt during Quarter 4 was largely responsible for the change in PHEV sales seen then.

Overall, the Tesla Model S held a 29% market share in Canada during 2015; the Chevy Volt a 22% market share; and the Nissan LEAF a 21% market share. No other electric offerings possessed a greater than 5% market share in 2015.

Image Credits: EV Volumes

Reprinted with permission.

 
 
Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.
 
Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.
 

Tags: ,


About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • Car

    Yeah, EV sales only sell in Socialist Countries, but in America, everyone sticks with Muscle and Performance when buying top notch.

    • Bob_Wallace

      Keep on pleasuring that chicken, bubba….

    • Martin

      Gee I thought Tesla’s were build in the US and you have to wait for months to get one after you order one.

  • Martin

    Now to take that in the following context:
    BC Hydro has a webpage that states: you can save about 75 % on ‘fuel’ cost if you drive electric in BC.
    Question; why are people still buying ICE, it must be because they like paying more to drive!

    • Brett

      I get what you’re saying, but range anxiety is still there, and upfront capital investment for electric can be fairly intimidating.

      Kinda like how people rent a water tank instead of owning one.

      Regardless, I think the market is still at the ‘blade’ of the hockey stick point, the massive explosion in EV sales is coming, and like in the next 2-3 years.

      30% year on year growth is pretty good by any industry metric.

    • Superchargers in Canada are still pretty sparse. And despite BC property costs, not all of us are loaded enough for a Model S (likely due to BC property costs!).

      There was a Tesla representative that stayed at a hotel in Victoria recently. I suspect he was provisioning property for either a sales / maintenance location or supercharger(s).

    • rockyredneck

      They are driving ICE because there is no such thing as a practical, affordable EV that is suitable for all Canadians. In my case, with a compact car driven low mileage, even free electricity would not give a reasonable payback, not to mention all the other disadvantages, such as a lack of fast charging stations, little availability and variety in EVs, and a cold climate. Then again. my current car will not need replacing for a long while yet, even though it is nearly 10 years old.

      • Martin

        I guess the people in Norway must be fools to buy EV. at a rate of about 30 % of total sales. Last I checked Norway is a cold country similar to Canada.
        And in 10 years or so you will have lots of section of buying a used EV.

      • Martin

        I guess the people in Norway must be fools to buy EV. at a rate of about 30 % of total sales. Last I checked Norway is a cold country similar to Canada.
        And in 10 years or so you will have lots of section of buying a used EV.

        • rockyredneck

          If you think there are any similarities between Canada and Norway other than latitude and oil exports, then you need to get out the geography books. 10 dollar a gallon gas (that’s about 3.50 a litre in Canadian terms) is just one difference. Perhaps Americans should pay as much? Even 70% of Norwegians are still buying ICE as you pointed out. Could it be that they live in the colder parts of the country?
          In ten years or so I will probably seriously consider an EV. Perhaps sooner as the market evolves.
          You make the common mistake of assuming that everyone has the same situation. Now you want to call me a fool for pointing out your error in thinking?

        • rockyredneck

          If you think there are any similarities between Canada and Norway other than latitude and oil exports, then you need to get out the geography books. 10 dollar a gallon gas (that’s about 3.50 a litre in Canadian terms) is just one difference. Perhaps Americans should pay as much? Even 70% of Norwegians are still buying ICE as you pointed out. Could it be that they live in the colder parts of the country?
          In ten years or so I will probably seriously consider an EV. Perhaps sooner as the market evolves.
          You make the common mistake of assuming that everyone has the same situation. Now you want to call me a fool for pointing out your error in thinking?

Back to Top ↑