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Buildings ZedFactory LandARK

Published on July 23rd, 2014 | by Jo Borrás

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LandARK Promises Elegant, Ultra-light Mobile Housing

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July 23rd, 2014 by  

ZedFactory LandARK

ZedFactory calls itself a leader in the field of zero-carbon design and development — and, if you look at this tiny house project, the ultra-lightweight LandARK shown here, you can see it’s pretty serious about living up to that claim!

Designed as an elegant structure that could be used as a home or green, mobile office, the LandARK hopes to side-step the complex planning and zoning requirements of a permanent building by being extremely mobile. Such portability, ZedFactory claims, “allows siting in areas of outstanding natural beauty.”

You can read some of ZedFactory’s words on the concept, below …

(LandARK) works well as a home or office. Sleeps up to 8 people as a shorter stay cabin. Is cosy in winter and cool in summer. Is made from healthy natural materials such as FSC timber. Perches on the land without needing expensive foundations or concrete. Runs off logs in winter or uses the summer sun to provide a hot shower. Is powered from sunlight for most of the year, or mid winter wind. Doesn’t need a connection to the drains or the meter, unless you do. Includes water tanks with options to connect to a standpipe. Blends into the landscape with weatherboarding and a sedum roof. Will last many generations if it is loved.

… and get a sense of how lightweight Zed thinks these things can be when you see an illustration of a fully-furnished LandARK resting gently atop a few bicycles, below. Whether or not ZedFactory expects you to round up your local, sexy peloton to move your new tiny house isn’t clearly stated, but what is clear is that the LandARK is made from sustainable materials, makes extensive use of solar energy, and has a green roof. It can also serve as a “for real” home by connecting itself to a city’s water grid. “It … doesn’t need a connection to the drains or the meter, unless you do,” says Bill Dunster, the LandARK’s designer at ZedFactory.

ProTip for Bill: we probably do.

Source | Images: ZedFactory, via Treehugger.

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About the Author

I've been involved in motorsports and tuning since 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the Important Media network. You can find me on Twitter, Skype (jo.borras) or Google+.



  • anderlan

    In the event of extreme weather, Land Ark becomes a high-lift wing system and its name becomes “Air Ark.” No need for foundations indeed.

    • Alexander López

      Jokes aside, the wind blowing underneath will create a lower pressure than on the upper side because of the ground. That generates downward force, just like on racing cars, affirming it to the ground.

      Now, when it’s time for a river flooding, the all-wooden construction, curved shape and no permanent foundation means the LandARK might float away. That way home owners wouldn’t need to hire expensive moving services to relocate the house, hehe.

  • Benjamin Nead

    ” . . . and get a sense of how lightweight Zed thinks these things can be when
    you see an illustration of a fully-furnished LandARK resting gently atop
    a few bicycle, below.”

    I don’t think that’s the case, Jo. My guess is that a wood structure like this wouldn’t be able to be hauled around that easily, nor would it be very stable in the wind if it really was that light. Rather, the bikes appear to simply be parked underneath the edges.

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