CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Uncategorized 2014 Nissan LEAF™

Published on July 10th, 2014 | by Christopher DeMorro

3

Nissan Launches “No Charge to Charge” Program For LEAF Buyers

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

July 10th, 2014 by  

2014 Nissan LEAF™One of the biggest benefits of driving an electric car is the low cost of refueling, which in a car like the Nissan LEAF generally runs between $2 and $4 from an in-home charger. Out in public though, you’re at the mercy of privately-run charging stations that often cost a whole lot more. Until now.

Nissan has expended its “No Charge to Charge” Program, offering new Nissan LEAF buyers two years of free charging from over 2,600 public charging stations in 10 major metro areas. Now going electric has gotten even cheaper.

Nissan recently expanded its CHAdeMO fast-charging network, adding over 500 stations in the past 18 months and bringing the total number to well over 600 stations. This new network of free fast chargers is Nissan’s way of competing with the Tesla Supercharger network, which offers fast, free charging with the purchase of a properly-equipped Model S.

The “No Charge to Charge” program originally launched in Texas in April and proved very popular, leading to the wider rollout. Going forward, Nissan will offer new LEAF buyers two years of free charging at Chargepoint, CarCharging, Blink, AeroVironment, and NRG eVgo EV charging stations in the San Francisco, Sacramento, San Diego, Seattle, Portland, Oregon., Nashville, Phoenix, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Houston and Washington, D.C. areas. Nissan plans to expand the program to 15 additional markets next year, building up its own nationwide network of fast chargers to compete with Tesla. Nissan is also reportedly talking to Tesla about sharing its Supercharger technology, which could help usher in an all-new era of fast-charging EVs across America. And for LEAF buyers, it means even more savings compared to their old combustion cars, which makes it a win-win for everyone.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.



Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

A writer and gearhead who loves all things automotive, from hybrids to HEMIs, can be found wrenching or writing- or esle, he's running, because he's one of those crazy people who gets enjoyment from running insane distances.



  • Jim Seko

    Nissan has a CHAdeMO problem which needs a soluttion. A friend of mine was an early adopter and leased a 2012 Nissan Leaf. The CHAdeMO fast charger is great but only WHEN it works. My friend has experienced “thermostat error” several times and is frustrated about the whole experience. When there is a problem the CHAdeMO can only be reset by a service technician. The sales people are never very helpful. I can’t imagine this happening at Tesla store. There is an air intake on CHAdeMO charging stations that always seems to be clogged when the “thermostat error” shuts the charger down. I’m no expert on fast chargers but if an electrical device needs lots of cooling air on a hot day it should have a well thought out air filtration method. The problem could be temporarily solved if a service tech could check the air intake daily and clean it when necessary.

    • http://jpwhitehome.wordpress.com JP White

      I’ve experienced the temperature error myself twice, and know of several folks who have similar tales.

      It tuns out that there is a filter on Nissan branded CHAdeMO units that require regular cleaning to prevent the unit overheating. Most property owners/hosts are blissfully unaware of this maintenance requirement. Nissan have communicated this requirement to all property owners, but the person informed (say at a corporate head office) may not get the information down to the correct people at each location.

      This is the first summer for many of these newly installed units. Its a learning period for everyone. Even the dealer I purchased my LEAF from didn’t know of the maintenance requirement and their unit succumbed to the same fate. Once property owners get their maintenance guys to clean the filters on a schedule like they do with their HVAC units, all will be well.

      • Bob_Wallace

        Sounds like the chargers need to be just a bit starter. They should text maintenance before they reach the critical stage.

        “Hey, Vern. Get down here! I’m starting to get warm!”

Back to Top ↑