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Published on June 17th, 2014 | by Christopher DeMorro

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After 28,000 Miles, Tesla Model S Still At 99% Of Its Battery Capacity (VIDEO)

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June 17th, 2014 by  

Originally published on Gas2.

We’re just two years into the great Tesla experiment, but some drivers have already driven enough to circumnavigate the planet. One question many would-be Tesla buyers have is how well will the battery last after a bunch of driving? After 28,000 miles, one owner has an answer.

A YouTuber that goes by the moniker KManAuto posted this video showing his 60 kWh Tesla Model S still retains 99% of its battery capacity 28,000 miles after he first got it. When he first got his car, the Model S gave him an estimated range of 209 miles, but after essentially driving around the Earth, the Tesla is still good for an estimated 206 miles of driving.

tesla-battery-pack

Image Credit: Tesla

The longevity of Tesla’s battery pack has to do with how they’ve built their batteries, relying on thousands of individual battery cells rather than a single large unit. This allows for high-speed Supercharging and a long-lasting battery. Tesla also liquid cools its batteries to keep range-reducing heat from adversely affecting it, helping making it likely the best battery on the market.

Though maybe not for long. Tesla has opened its patents to the world, and will allow other automakers to use its technology to advance electric vehicles. Those worrying that a costly electric vehicle might end up as dead weight with a dead battery after a few years can breathe a sigh of relief.

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About the Author

A writer and gearhead who loves all things automotive, from hybrids to HEMIs, can be found wrenching or writing- or esle, he's running, because he's one of those crazy people who gets enjoyment from running insane distances.



  • Kris Trader

    tesla know their patents will be worthless once dual carbon battery technology made by POWER JAPAN PLUS INC is fully developed and utilised

  • Chris_in_Raleigh

    For what it’s worth, my 2013 Nissan Leaf still has 12 of 12 bars of capacity at 20k miles.

    The range indicator is affected by many things so I haven’t attempted to use that to gauge capacity.

    • bink

      Chris you are so right, I read an article just the other day not to use the gauge as a measurement of remaining capacity it will not tell you what it is measuring against and I do not recall Tesla announcing some technological breakthrough which solves Li ion battery degradation because aging will effect it as well if you do nothing else

      • Wayne Williamson

        So the best thing is to go ahead and drive the miles(or atleast 90 percent) to verify that the reading is accurate.

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