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Cars Google Self-Driving Car & Its View (VIDEO)

Published on May 1st, 2014 | by Christopher DeMorro

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Google Self-Driving Car & Its View (VIDEO)

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May 1st, 2014 by
 

Originally published on Gas2.

We’re finally getting the self-driving car we deserves thanks to Google, but how does it work? See what’s Google’s autonomous car sees in this new video. The future of driving is all pink boxes and red fences, apparently.

It’s actually way more complicated than that, though I hadn’t realized just how advanced Google’s c really is. Then I stopped to think for a minute about all the road hazards, obstacles, drivers, and pedestrians one has to avoid on even a short trip to the store. This video handily explains how the Google autonomous car handles these issues with aplomb. It all comes down to an advanced algorithm that can navigate construction zones and busy intersections with equal ease, though the system seems a bit overly cautious, to the point that I wouldn’t want to be stuck behind one.

Then again, Google’s self-driving cars are supposedly better drivers than you, me, and just about everyone else.

Though not ready for prime time, Google has kicked off a rush to develop autonomous vehicles that can handle the complications of the daily commute with minimal human input. Now imagine combining the Tesla Model S with Google’s autonomous driving technology, throw in a dash of Google Glass, and you’ve got a pretty picture of the future of driving.

Source: Google via Jalopnik

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About the Author

A writer and gearhead who loves all things automotive, from hybrids to HEMIs, can be found wrenching or writing- or esle, he's running, because he's one of those crazy people who gets enjoyment from running insane distances.



  • Otis11

    Autonomous cars can reduce accidents, increase fuel efficiency, and improve traffic flow… I, for one, cannot wait until they are economical. (I’m eyeing you – guy shaving and girl putting on makeup in traffic…)

    Plus – how great would it be to have a computer that allows you to run red lights because it knows no one is coming? And increase speed limits safely to get to your destination more quickly?

  • Wayne Williamson

    wow…really cool. To the other posters, I would just say that car accidents are a major cause of injury and death in the US(?/33k). Ok, could not find the injury stat, But the number of accidents in 2009 was 10.8 million If this tech can reduce it, it is well worth it.

    • Bob_Wallace

      I suspect we’re going to see some aspects of self-driving included very rapidly. I wouldn’t at all be surprised to see a requirement for collision avoidance systems like we have for air bags.

  • Mainlander

    Why?

    • A Real Libertarian

      Why?

      Why not?

      Oh, right…

      It’s because you’re so conservative you think things haven’t changed since the 1850s.

      • Melody Lin

        I don’t know if it’s a conservative/liberal thing. Many conservatives I know are always excited about new technology and innovation. I think some people are just worried about the practicality of these things…They contest it is better in some ways, and I think they may well be right. Humans lack the ability to concentrate for any real length of time, and repetitive tasks ease us into mindlessness. Computers can hold speed and distance with far more accuracy than a human, never gets bored or angry or drunk and can recognise patterns. The patterns are actually there in the highway code.

        My one question is this – Would the passengers be liable for any accidents? Would Google be liable? It seems like a mess. I have a good driving record and enjoy pretty cheap insurance rates ($26/month from Insurance Panda.. woohoo!). I also enjoy taking my car out for a spin and enjoying the ‘freedom’ of being able to drive anywhere. Will the driverless car allow all this? If not, I’ll have to pass.

        IMO.. Until they can ensure that there are no humans taking control of the wheel, insurance will be needed… at least uninsured motorist. Who knows? Maybe insurance as we know it will go away, replaced by any number of models that would more accurately represent the new risk distribution.

  • DonnaTWhittingham

    This video handily explains how the Google autonomous car handles these issues with aplomb. It all comes down to an advanced algorithm that can navigate construction zones and busy intersections with equal ease, though the system seems a bit overly cautious, to the point that I wouldn’t want to be stuck behind one. http://sn.im/28v8jxb

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