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Published on March 11th, 2014 | by Christopher DeMorro

5

Chevy Volt Has Been Revamped For 2016 (Entertaining Rumors)

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March 11th, 2014 by
 

Originally published on Gas 2.

volt-concept

Rumor has it that next year, GM will debut an all-new 2016 Chevy Volt that gets a new look and a new front-wheel drive platform. Combined with other rumors, such as an all-new three-cylinder generator and a potential 200-mile range, the second-generation Volt is shaping up to be a real contender.

Edmunds cited an unnamed source that says next year GM is going to reveal the 2016 Volt with a different, but not dramatically restyled look. It should still look like a Volt, I guess? More important though is the announcement that the 2016 Chevy Volt will debut on an all-new front-drive platform. Hopefully this new platform is more conducive to the Volt’s battery layout, though the current layout has already racked up hundreds of millions of electric driving miles.

So, while I’m at it, let’s look at a roundup of other next-gen Volt rumors. The one I put the most stock in is the rumor of a new, three-cylinder engine to serve as the generator. That should give it better fuel economy and running efficiency, while shaving some weight at the same time.

Less likely is the rumor that the next-gen Volt will have an enormous increase in driving range, such as 200-miles some rumors seem to suggest. Even 100 miles would probably be a stretch, though I’m willing to bet GM will up the electric-only range to over 50 miles. That would give the Volt a lot more versatility, even if the price stays about the same.

Other than that, I don’t think GM is planning to rock the plug-in hybrid too much. The Volt has proven a steady seller, if not a break-out success, and if GM can find way to shave costs while improving performance, it might convert more believers to the hybrid flock.

Source: Edmunds

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About the Author

A writer and gearhead who loves all things automotive, from hybrids to HEMIs, can be found wrenching or writing- or esle, he's running, because he's one of those crazy people who gets enjoyment from running insane distances.



  • Jonathan Martin

    I think you are much more likely to see a smaller battery and a 40 mile range than a significantly larger range. Right now the Volt only uses 10.8 of the 16.5 kWh in the battery pack. They have learned a lot in those millions of EV miles and I bet they are going to be a lot more comfortable giving access to more of that battery without fear of getting killed with warranty claims (8 years on the current models). If they are correct and 38-40 miles can meet the needs of over 70% of Americans, doesn’t it make more business sense to reduce costs so that more people can afford it? I would expect that keeping the cost the same, but targeting some of those other 30% would result in fewer additional sales.

  • Otis11

    Any idea on when we will get solid details? I’d love to see this have a 60+ mile range. That would be awesome! If it got 80+ miles, that would be perfect.

  • Bob Fearn

    If GM and other major car companies don’t make EV’s a priority they will be no more.

    • Bob_Wallace

      Were I running a car company (other than Nissan, GM or Tesla) I’m not sure I’d be manufacturing a lot of EVs right now.

      There’s only limited market demand. Prices are high and ranges for the more affordable BEVs are limited. I’d probably want to make sure my company was ready to roll out one or more models once the battery situation improved.

      GM is making an EV. They’ve got the most successful PHEV. They have been improving it and reducing the price.

  • JamesWimberley

    It makes sense for hybrid makers to shift the balance steadily between the battery and the ICE range extender, gradually shrinking the latter until it becomes an emergency thing like a spare wheel.

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