CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Clean Power jim-rogers-duke

Published on January 30th, 2014 | by The Alliance for Solar Choice (TASC)

2

TASC Open Letter To Former Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

January 30th, 2014 by
 
Dear Mr. Rogers,

We read your interview with Martin Rosenberg of EnergyBiz. In particular, these remarks stand out:

ENERGYBIZ: If you were starting out your career today, where would you want to work?

Rogers: I’d want the solar on the rooftop. I’d want to run that. I’d want the ability to deploy new technologies that lead to productivity gains to the use of electricity in homes and businesses. I would go after the monopoly that I see weakened over the last 25 years.  My goal would be to take customers away from utilities as fast as I could, because I think they’re vulnerable. Regulations will not be changed fast enough to protect them.  The business model will not be changed fast enough.

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves, Jim.

Utilities are resorting to dirty and ineffective tactics to preserve their antiquated monopolies.  Last year, Arizona Public Service (APS) funded a multimillion-dollar anti-solar campaign. Reports of APS lying repeatedly about funding phony grassroots organizations and ads attacking their own customers unveiled an entire web of dark money.  What’s more, the utility trade association, Edison Electric Institute (EEI), joined APS with its own TV and radio ads attacking rooftop solar customers.  Despite spending millions and damaging their own brands, APS and EEI failed.  Regulators upheld net metering, and Arizonans still love solar.  What they did accomplish was dragging down APS’s net approval with its own customers by 13 points.

Arizona proves your point: utilities can’t enforce rapid regulatory protections to preserve their monopolies.

But utilities do have a choice.  They can figure out how to adapt to avoid following in APS’s failed footsteps.  Duke, for example, can still make the right choice.  Unfortunately, your successor Lynn Good lacks your vision.  Just last week she met with local reporters and attacked rooftop solar to defend Duke’s monopoly.

As former CEO and President of Duke Energy and former Chairman of the Edison Electric Institute, you are uniquely positioned to help Duke and its trade association see a better way forward.  Help them realize that rent-seeking from regulators to protect their monopolies, instead of adapting to serve the needs of today’s energy consumers, is a short-sighted and deeply flawed strategy.  It failed for APS.  It will fail for Duke.

Sincerely,
Bryan Miller and John Stanton, co-Chairs of The Alliance for Solar Choice (TASC)

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , ,


About the Author

advocates for maintaining successful distributed solar energy policies, such as retail net metering, throughout the United States. Retail net metering (NEM) provides fair credit to residents, businesses, churches, schools, and other public agencies when their solar systems export excess energy to the grid. The Alliance for Solar Choice (TASC) was formed on the belief that anyone should have the option to switch from utility power to distributed solar power, and realize the financial benefits therein. The rooftop solar market has been largely driven by Americans’ desire to assert control over their electric bills, a trend that should be encouraged.



  • Matt

    “Funny” line given Duke’s “green?” record while he was CEO. But then i.e. was “If he were started today” not “What you you do as a Utility CEO”

  • Steeple

    Just like Labor Unions that held on too long to a failed model, now Utilities based on central power generating plants are fighting a rear guard action. Some may still have a chance to survive if they can embrace the large solar installation model. Otherwise, they will become like Cable companies where their greatest value is transmission.

Back to Top ↑