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CO2 Emissions watercarts

Published on January 16th, 2014 | by Zachary Shahan

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WaterStop Carts Look To Flip Water Industry On Its Head

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January 16th, 2014 by Zachary Shahan 

watercarts“Water” is actually one of our categories here on CleanTechnica — it doesn’t get as much love as solar energy or electric cars, but it’s a critical topic, and a lot of work needs to be done to both 1) make the water industry cleaner and 2) provide clean water to more people. WaterStop Carts LLC is a new clean water solution that I think deserves a bit of attention for what it’s looking to do here*.

As the video below articulates well, the bottled water industry results in an incomprehensible amount of plastic waste every year… well, every day! The industry is actually a rather young one, and it plays on water quality fears as well as the taste buds of humans. But even if we choose to have a privately cleaned, taste-bud approved water industry, that doesn’t mean we need to produce so much harmful plastic. As I’m sure you could guess, that’s where WaterStop Carts come in.

Check out their really beautiful and creative video for their crowdfunding campaign:

As the video above summarizes in kinder words, the bottled water industry is robbing us and trashing our planet. It’s high time that a competitor comes in that can address those key two points that make the bottled water industry so “successful” — water quality concerns and human taste buds.

WaterStop Carts is raising funds on IndieGogo to get rolling — no pun intended. Here are a few key quotes from that page that I think are worth highlighting:

  • “Why? Because our world is facing a clean water crisis and it makes me angry that the bottled water industry has taken life’s essential element and made a commodity of it!”
  • As consumers we are paying between 300 to 4,000 times the costs of tap water when we buy bottled water. The average American spends over $250 a year on bottled water. We also end up paying for the cost to our environment of carbon released and the oil and water used in manufacturing and transportation.”
  • “The cart uses municipal water sources and the same filtration system used by bottled water companies.”

Ah, there is of course one more critical factor WaterStop Carts addresses — convenience. The fact of the matter is, even if you are cool drinking publicly provided tap water, it can be very difficult to find such water in public and at major events — conferences, sports arenas, concerts, etc.

“Accessibility through Mobility”is the foundation of our thinking at WaterStop. Our mobile water carts go where people go, venues of all kinds. Sometimes we just say it’s “water on wheels.” The cart uses municipal water sources and the same filtration system used by bottled water companies. It delivers purified, fresh tasting water, it’s like bottled water without the bottle.

The company’s founder and CEO, Nan Harris, who sold her Manhattan co-op in order to start this company, has bigger visions for the next generation of WaterStop Carts as well:

The Second Generation cart will also have Wifi so the cart becomes not only a Water Stop but a Hot Spot as well. A solar tower will be added to extend the battery life. Eventually, when solar can produce enough energy to run our mobile cart, we will convert to solar completely. One final note, the completed look of the cart will have a modern, sleek design.

For more info or to donate, head on over to the WaterStop Carts IndieGogo page.

*This article has been supported by WaterStop Carts LLC, but as is always the case: we don’t run sponsored articles for technologies or companies that we don’t think deserve more eyes and positive press.

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About the Author

spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as the director/chief editor. Otherwise, he's probably enthusiastically fulfilling his duties as the director/editor of Solar Love, EV Obsession, Planetsave, or Bikocity. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and wind energy expert. If you would like him to speak at a related conference or event, connect with him via social media. You can connect with Zach on any popular social networking site you like. Links to all of his main social media profiles are on ZacharyShahan.com.



  • AOK

    I abhor bottled water, and I think this is an interesting concept that probably has some extremely useful applications. I am curious to see how they pan out. But, I do not like that it is feeding the concept that the municipal water in our country has something wrong with it. “Watercarts” already exist in our office buildings, they’re called water fountains. FYI, they say to go to their website, but it is under construction.

    • Sal

      FYI…Buildings constructed before 1974 have both sediment and the potential of contamination…do your homework.

      • AOK

        Sal, thank you for your input. Taking your word for it, I guess maybe I won’t drink tap water in buildings older than 40 years. Regardless, I kind of think you missed my point.

        • Sal

          Hey AOK, actually if you look at the studies on water fountains you will find that 90% consumers hate them because homeless wash in them, people spit back into them, they’re impossible to refill a bottle etc. Waters my area of study…I didn’t see their website, they said to go the crowdfunding site, which I did….I think its very interesting

          • AOK

            I think it is interesting too, but as I said initially, I just don’t care to perpetuate the general myth that there is something wrong with our tap water. I am not surprised that 90% of people don’t like water fountains (which by the way, my statement was just making a point), but we need to look at the bigger picture. We are fixated on bottled water because we fell prey to one of the greatest marketing campaigns ever. Watercarts surely has a time and a place, as does bottled water, but as a society we need to evaluate why it is we find it so terrible to drink our tap water. I always ask people would they still buy bottled beer if they could suddenly get it out of their tap.

  • A Real Libertarian

    “it plays on water quality fears as well as the taste buds of humans”

    The ironic thing?

    Bottled water safety standards are nowhere near as strict as municipal water safety standards.

  • Michael Berndtson

    I’m not sure what these guys are selling. Privatizing public water supply isn’t cool. Though it reminded me of a recent story. Not to bring up the boogieman(men) on Cleantechnica, but here’s a Fortune Magazine story on Koch Industries and its interest in getting into the water supply and wastewater treatment business:

    http://money.cnn.com/2013/12/19/leadership/koch-brothers.pr.fortune/

    The internet post is a summary – the full article is behind a paywall. I’m wondering if Koch treatment units for municipal and industrial clients are based on free market economics and Ayn Rand exceptionalism over say old fashion performance based monitoring and sample analysis. This is really getting scary. Even for a paranoiac like me. Koch pays $125 million for MIT’s chemical engineering department to become the family’s private research institute. Funds anti environmental regulation and anti government legislation and legislators – and now wants to get into the water supply business? We’re screwed folks.

    • Steeple

      You do seem a bit paranoid. Koch privatizing the research of a university like MIT? (Don’t forget that both Charles and David Koch are MIT Engineers). Did David Koch “privatize” the NY City Ballet troupe by donating $100MM?

      We should worry about other things than the evil (hah) Koch Brothers monopolizing the world’s water supply.

      • Michael Berndtson

        Funding a ballet specifically and philanthropy in general is a ruse. One part indulgence and one part tax dodge. Fine arts should be funded after tax. I think only David Koch is a chemical engineer and now the department is Named “David H. Koch School of Chemical Engineering Something or Other.” A name branded department like that will become increasingly an embarrassment to MIT. Especially when nobody trusts its research findings.

        • Steeple

          Nobody trusts MIT’s research findings? I’ll have to let them know that.

          $100MM donation is a ruse? Really? Trying to trick Ballet goers into Free Market advocates?

          You are correct on one item. David is a Chemical Engineer; Charles is a Nuclear Engineer.

          • A Real Libertarian

            “$100MM donation is a ruse? Really? Trying to trick Ballet goers into Free Market advocates?”

            Trying for tax dodges, some good publicity, feeding narcissism, lot’s of things.

            “David H. Koch School of Chemical Engineering” sounds about as trustworthy as “Bernie Madoff School of Accounting” just so you know.

            “Free Market” is propaganda. The Koch Bros. learned a lot from Uncle Joe.

          • Steeple

            So you are comparing two of the great capitalists and entrepreneurs to one of the world’s greatest mass murderers, presuming you are referring to Stalin.

            So we know their Dad did business in Russia in the 30s. Charles and David would be toddlers at that point.

            So go on and connect the dots about what you believe the Koch Bros. learned from Joseph Stalin and how they have applied that to their businesses.

            Let’s see what you’ve got, Big Boy.

          • A Real Libertarian

            “So you are comparing two of the great capitalists and entrepreneurs to one of the world’s greatest mass murderers, presuming you are referring to Stalin.”

            They inherited a multimillion dollar company, that takes no talent. They grew it to Fortune 20 status by organized crime, that takes psychopathy.

            “So we know their Dad did business in Russia in the 30s. Charles and David would be toddlers at that point.”

            Fred built the Soviet oil industry from the 20s to the 50s. At the point the relationship ended Dave was 16 and Charlie 21.

            “So go on and connect the dots about what you believe the Koch Bros. learned from Joseph Stalin and how they have applied that to their businesses.

            Let’s see what you’ve got, Big Boy.”

            Take a look:

            http://exiledonline.com/a-peoples-history-of-koch-industries-how-stalin-funded-the-tea-party-movement/

          • Steeple

            Their Dad died 46 years ago. There are now in the Fortune Top 10 of wealthiest Americans. That you think they just magically ascended there because of their Dad shows how little you know about running a business.

            Organized crime?

            Keep trying to jump the shark. It’s not working and you look like the fool that you are.

            Please don’t waste any more of my time.

          • A Real Libertarian

            “Organized crime?”

            According to Bill, yes. “But that’s what appalled me so much… I did not want my family, my legacy, my father’s legacy to be based upon organized crime.”

    • Tobi Roberts

      I think you need to read the crowd funding site…it clearly states that they are selling carts. bottles and filters…not water!

  • Kyle Field

    That looks to be a great idea across the board with one exception – a “manned” cart seems like a huge waste as well. I get that going with a cart vs a dispensing machine adds a more personal unique touch and might help create brand identity, product differentiation, etc but it feels like stand alone vending machines/dispensing machines would be the way to go. I like the addition of a hotspot though I can’t really see much of a use for it if folks dont have a sitting area. Maybe that’s the next addition – fold out seating around the vending machine for wifi users. LoL :D

    • Tobi Roberts

      Hey, no were does it say “manned” in fact the guy in the video talks about locking it down…clearly vending machine, or stand alone refill stations is not what they are talking about…a mobile cart to go were people go….I Get it and think its really smart!.

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