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Published on October 3rd, 2013 | by Guest Contributor

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SEIA To Congress: Government Shut Down Not Good, Please End This

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October 3rd, 2013 by
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Concerned that a prolonged government shutdown could do long-term harm to the U.S. economy, SEIA President and CEO Rhone Resch this week issued the following statement:

“As an industry organization representing 120,000 workers – and as Americans concerned about our nation’s future – we are deeply disappointed that Congress has failed to avoid a government shutdown.  With the U.S. economy still struggling to regain its footing and unemployment unacceptably high, a prolonged shutdown could be disruptive to the U.S. economy and hamper future growth.  SEIA strongly urges Congressional leaders to call an immediate truce, return to work and resume negotiations on plan that will fund the government while helping to get our economy back on track.  Too much is at stake for this effort to fail.”

With the government shutting down, here are some of the impacts on America’s solar industry:

  • The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) solar permitting activities are on hold until an appropriations bill is signed into law.  Construction of solar projects under an existing right-of-way grant may proceed as usual, unless that construction may result in damage to governmental property or may cause a threat to safety.
  • If the shutdown is short-lived, the Department of Energy (DOE) expects to continue operating as usual, because it has funds from prior years that it can use to pay for salaries and contracts.  However, DOE warns that a “prolonged lapse in appropriations” will require many employees to be furloughed.  For the time being, though, the Solar Program, the Loan Program Office and the national labs will continue operating.
  • Like DOE, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has funding available from prior years to temporarily continue its normal operations and has published a notice to that effect.  If the shutdown lasts longer than FERC has money to pay salaries, FERC will notify the public that most of its operations will pause.  In that event, the Commissioners will still be available to vote on orders that require Commission action, but new filings and public comments will not be accepted.  Deadlines and due dates will be adjusted accordingly.
  • At the Treasury Department, all 1603 Program office personnel have been furloughed.  No 1603 grants will be issued during the shutdown.  The 1603 Program online application system will remain open and allow certain changes and updates to project status.

About SEIA:
Established in 1974, the Solar Energy Industries Association® is the national trade association of the U.S. solar energy industry. Through advocacy and education, SEIA® is building a strong solar industry to power America. As the voice of the industry, SEIA works with its 1,000 member companies to make solar a mainstream and significant energy source by expanding markets, removing market barriers strengthening the industry and educating the public on the benefits of solar energy. Visit SEIA online at www.seia.org.

More on the government shutdown can be found here:

  1. Big Money Turns On Tea Party Crazies That It Helped To Spawn
  2. 7 Reasons Extremist Republicans Have Taken The United States Hostage (+ 1 Silver Lining)
  3. Republicans Tearing Up Republicans (VIDEO)
  4. Rachel Maddow On Rich White Men Talking To Empty Chairs

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

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  • Matt

    When your goal is to prove that state and federal government don’t work, closing do the government is a good thing. That fact that it might hurt the country is an acceptable cost to proving their point.

  • JamesWimberley

    Statements by busimess groups linled to a politically liberal base are of no consequence in a crisiscreated entirely by right-wing Republicans. The statements to watch are ones from GOP-leaning interests, especially Wall Street.

  • Shiggity

    Every discussion board I’ve been to has quashed every republican talking point within a matter of seconds. If they don’t lose everything in 2014 it will unanimously prove the electoral college system is broken and our republic is systemically broken.

    • Bob_Wallace

      People who dislike how the Tea Party Republicans in the House are behaving will have to get to the polls in 2014 and vote.

      They did not show up in 2010 and let these people into office. They let others pick their representatives.

      The districts from which the ~30 TP Reps come may be too red to turn around. But other districts can be won.

      • Shiggity

        The districts are ‘too red’ because the state politicians purposely draw them that way. They draw out people they know vote democratic because they can see exactly who voted for what down to the individual house level.

        You’ll see a ‘red’ district with ~5000 people next to a ‘blue’ district with 50000. Yet with our electoral system, they get the same weight.

        • Bob_Wallace

          I don’t think you can have a 5,000:50,000 districting. Districts have to be approximately equal numbers. That’s how Reps are assigned per state.
          That some very red pockets were carved out by drawing lots of wiggly lines, yes.

          California got tired of this junk and turned districting over to a non-political group.

          • Shiggity

            http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/09/26/weekinreview/26marsh.html?_r=0

            Democrats are guilty of doing the same thing. The House of Representatives is a joke.

            The same Supreme Court that upheld Citizen’s United also upheld the insane redistricting. The legacy of Bush is going to go for decades unfortunately.

          • Bob_Wallace

            How about not dropping bare links?

            If what you’ve got is worth sharing it’s worth describing or a C&P. NYT and other sources have limits on how many free looks one gets per month.

          • Shiggity

            Do what you did for the WSJ article.

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