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Clean Power Offshore Wind Farm Turbine (Thames Estuary)

Published on September 4th, 2013 | by Joshua S Hill

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Rupee’s Plunge Threatens Indian Wind Industry

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September 4th, 2013 by
 
Bloomberg is reporting that the “rupee’s biggest plunge in 20 years” could have serious billion-dollar repercussions for the country’s burgeoning wind industry, with higher finance and import costs negating benefits from the government subsidy which was reimplemented last month.

An advisor for the Reserve Bank of India noted that the rupee could sink past 70 per dollar despite the Bank’s attempts to step the plunge. “There’s a high probability” of the rupee ending 2013 at 65 to 70 and an “external shock could push it above 70,” Arvind Virmani, a member of the Reserve Bank’s advisory panel on monetary policy, said in e-mailed responses to questions posed by Bloomberg.

The rupee has been in decline against the US dollar ever since May of this year, with reports varying from 17% to 19% drops against the year’s opening.

Subsequently, according to Mahesh Makhija, director of renewables at the Indian unit of CLP Holdings, the slide has stalled new investment plans, while turbine makers Suzlon Energy and Gamesa — who consider India one of their top three markets — may raise prices.

“A rapidly falling rupee affects investor confidence in the Indian economy and is likely to impact our expansion plans,” Makhija said. “Manufacturers who aren’t hedged in the short-term could take the increased costs to customers over the next three to six months. Developers are also likely to be affected by growing inflation.”

This comes in the wake of positive Indian wind industry steps, taken by the Indian Ministry of New & Renewable Energy, which intends to launch the National Offshore Wind Energy Authority (NOWA).

NOWA’s aim will be to “proliferate deployment of offshore wind energy projects in” India, as well as maintaining responsibility for “carrying out resource assessment along the country’s coastline and survey potential project sites”.

Owing to my lack of financial expertise, the lion’s share of this article is based on work done by Bloomberg, with a healthy dose of corresponding information gathered from around reputable news sources. 

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About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.



  • addicted4444

    The messed up part is that the import of fossil fuels is one of the biggest factors in the plunging rupee. India is spending a significant percentage of its foreign reserves buying oil, gas and coal from abroad, which is causing the rupee to plummet. This was being back stopped by FDI inflows but now that they have dried up, outflows are huge.

    If the govt had been even slightly forward-looking they would have worked on encouraging the development of a local solar/wind manufacturing industry instead of continuing massive subsidies on fossil fuels (esp diesel) and commissioning coal plants which do not even have sufficient domestic coal supply and so have to import ridiculously expensive coal from abroad (further denting the rupee).

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