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Cars Image Credit: Volkswagen

Published on March 21st, 2013 | by Zachary Shahan

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VW up! Electric Car

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March 21st, 2013 by Zachary Shahan
 
While Volkswagen has announced a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Golf and the world’s most efficient car recently, the car below is the German company’s first all-electric car. And isn’t it cute.

vw e-up

Sister site Gas2 writes:

As if the Volkswagen pp! wasn’t frugal enough, the engineers at VW have decided to create an all-electric version of the tiny city car: the e-up!…

An electric motor will power the up! with 81 horsepower. While this is more than the normal 74 horsepower model, the electric version will be slower, owing to the additional weight of the battery pack. A 0-62 time of 14 seconds is slow whichever way you look at it, but it’s unlikely that up! buyers will have speed anywhere near their list of priorities. Top speed is just 84mph, but the car does have a respectable 155lb/ft of torque, which is available immediately.

A full charge of the 18.7kWh battery will give the little car a range of slightly more than 90 miles…. According to Volkswagen, 80 percent charge is reachable in just half an hour of being plugged in, which is quite impressive.

For some more details, check out the Gas2 post.

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • Otis11

    Wow, so you can charge a 72 mile range in 30 minutes! That’s pretty good!

  • Derek Bolton

    e-up!? Are they using a marketing company from Yorkshire?

  • Madan Rajan

    Finally Germans are getting into Electric Cars. Hope Volkswagen prices it affordably.

    Its also very important that Germans don’t use coal to run these cars. Last year Germany’s coal consumption increased.
    http://notrickszone.com/2013/01/12/germanys-green-energiewende-energy-transition-has-only-led-to-greater-coal-consumption/

    Meanwhile Chinese are building Gen-4 reactor and this could provide cheap clean energy.

    http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/ENF-Chinese_HTGR_fuel_plant_under_construction-2103134.html

  • http://www.facebook.com/rhodomel.meads Rhodomel Meads

    you don’t fully charge your battery…. that’s very bad for its life.
    you also don’t fully discharge your battery … it can become a total brick like the Tesla.

    To have a battery achieve longer life, you maintain and operate within State Of Charges, the upper limit not reaching full recharge, and not going below the lower limit of energy that needs to be left in the battery. While the battery may be 18.7kWh, it will not be used fully, or else you ruin the battery quickly.

    So what really is the useful working kWh of this battery? Why do Reporters never read the fine print about this very important information?

  • jburt56

    How many miles or km per kWh?

    • Ronald Brakels

      Should be more. Maybe 9 to 10 kilometres per kilowatt-hour as I would expect the minimum normal charge to be about 20% of the battery pack’s total capacity.

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