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Clean Power wind turbines jobs

Published on May 3rd, 2012 | by Zachary Shahan

1

Wind Power: An Important Economic Engine

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May 3rd, 2012 by Zachary Shahan
 
 
This is quite old — about a year old (ancient in internet time) — but I’m sure it’s as relevant today as it was a year ago. The bottom line of the story: wind power creates jobs, especially in some of the most hard-hit (economically) areas of our country.

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h/t Climate Denial Crock of the Week

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • Saurdigger

    Nice little video — some important aspects embedded

    1) marginal (underutilized or unusable for area purposes) land available
    2) land geography suitable to higher wind conditions
    3) rural land available (further from town, fewer noise complaints possible)
    4) transmission grid already in existence able to support/send large amount of power — as this is a big cost factor in a potential wind farm project, it must have made the town extremely attractive
    5) land lease and tax monies going to struggling town making the local population likely to be very supportive

    I’m a big booster of wind and I think it can easily produce 20-35% of an area’s electrical energy supply, more if cheap storage available. For most smaller communities, I think a smaller 1-5 turbine locally owned development would be best, but Goldendale’s a nice case to have a video about.

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