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Published on December 27th, 2008 | by Andrew Williams

82

US Becomes Largest Wind Power Producer in the World



The United States has overtaken Germany to become the largest producer of wind energy in the world, generating enough capacity to eliminate the burning of 91 million barrels of oil per year.

According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), US wind producers enjoyed another record year of growth in 2008—the third in a row. The country now has an installed wind power capacity well in excess of 21,000 megawatts (MW), enough to supply electricity to over 5.5 million American homes.

According to Randall Swisher, AWEA Executive DIrector, “Wind energy installations are well ahead of the curve for contributing 20% of the U.S. electric power supply by 2030 as envisioned by the U.S. Department of Energy.”

Amazingly, this rapid progress was achieved under a governing administration that to many seemed, at best, indifferent to the plight of the renewable energy industry. If the US wind power industry is capable of becoming a world-leader during such times, it seems quite likely that the picture could improve even further with a more sympathetic leader at the helm.

Image Credit: vaxomatic via flickr.com on a Creative Commons license

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About the Author

is a writer and freelance journalist specialising in sustainability and green issues. He lives in Cardiff, Wales.



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  • Brad (required)

    I don’t like Bush, so we have to pretend he was against this. Or maybe we could say he just did this to kill birds.

  • Brad (required)

    I don’t like Bush, so we have to pretend he was against this. Or maybe we could say he just did this to kill birds.

  • Brad (required)

    I don’t like Bush, so we have to pretend he was against this. Or maybe we could say he just did this to kill birds.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    Laura, many states use fuel oil to power small, localized generating stations, with many states having at least 10% of their energy needs derived from such.”

    Laura is more right than you. Except for states like Hawaii, only a small fraction of energy today comes from burning oil, in total its less than 3% of total generation.

    Most generation is from coal (about 50%), then nuclear and natural gas (20% each), then hydro and the rest (geothermal, wind etc. low single digit percent). But wind in Texas and California will not stop hawaii from burning oil and Texas doesnt burn oil for generation to begin with (heavy on nat gas and coal).

    So it would be more appropriate to indicate how much coal or natural gas is saved with wind. Nuclear is as emissions-free and more efficient than wind in economic respects, and uses such little fuel for a lot of generation, so its hardly any ‘savings’ to show to compare wind to nuclear.

    “Federal funding for solar and wind subsidies/research [under Bush] are higher than all previous administrations combined.” – I agree, and just note that this is an aspect of media blindness/bias that they wont acknowledge it.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    Laura, many states use fuel oil to power small, localized generating stations, with many states having at least 10% of their energy needs derived from such.”

    Laura is more right than you. Except for states like Hawaii, only a small fraction of energy today comes from burning oil, in total its less than 3% of total generation.

    Most generation is from coal (about 50%), then nuclear and natural gas (20% each), then hydro and the rest (geothermal, wind etc. low single digit percent). But wind in Texas and California will not stop hawaii from burning oil and Texas doesnt burn oil for generation to begin with (heavy on nat gas and coal).

    So it would be more appropriate to indicate how much coal or natural gas is saved with wind. Nuclear is as emissions-free and more efficient than wind in economic respects, and uses such little fuel for a lot of generation, so its hardly any ‘savings’ to show to compare wind to nuclear.

    “Federal funding for solar and wind subsidies/research [under Bush] are higher than all previous administrations combined.” – I agree, and just note that this is an aspect of media blindness/bias that they wont acknowledge it.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.”

    Your thinking is wrong. It would be idiotic to build them thus. You are probably confusing the effort to build more transmission infrastructure for new/future wind power installation. Texas has more installed wind power – on grid- than any other state! It was noted the number is 6,000MW… of the total 21,000MW in the US, this amounts to almost 30% of US installed base, in just Bush’s home state. The projections of 18,000MW is a further tripling in Texas alone. So someday Texas may have more windmill capacity than Germany.

    Again, the Bush administration has been very supportive of wind power via subsidies etc.

    “The Midwest used to almost entirely consist of trees and now is predominantly corn and soybean. ”

    Wrong, the midwest was mostly prairie. your location may vary.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.”

    Your thinking is wrong. It would be idiotic to build them thus. You are probably confusing the effort to build more transmission infrastructure for new/future wind power installation. Texas has more installed wind power – on grid- than any other state! It was noted the number is 6,000MW… of the total 21,000MW in the US, this amounts to almost 30% of US installed base, in just Bush’s home state. The projections of 18,000MW is a further tripling in Texas alone. So someday Texas may have more windmill capacity than Germany.

    Again, the Bush administration has been very supportive of wind power via subsidies etc.

    “The Midwest used to almost entirely consist of trees and now is predominantly corn and soybean. ”

    Wrong, the midwest was mostly prairie. your location may vary.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.”

    Your thinking is wrong. It would be idiotic to build them thus. You are probably confusing the effort to build more transmission infrastructure for new/future wind power installation. Texas has more installed wind power – on grid- than any other state! It was noted the number is 6,000MW… of the total 21,000MW in the US, this amounts to almost 30% of US installed base, in just Bush’s home state. The projections of 18,000MW is a further tripling in Texas alone. So someday Texas may have more windmill capacity than Germany.

    Again, the Bush administration has been very supportive of wind power via subsidies etc.

    “The Midwest used to almost entirely consist of trees and now is predominantly corn and soybean. ”

    Wrong, the midwest was mostly prairie. your location may vary.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state?”

    Correct. Bush has presided over many millions in subsidies for wind power (“After nearly a year of anticipation and uncertainty, Congress approved a one-year extension of the federal wind energy production tax credit (PTC), which enables utilities, wind energy developers and manufacturers to continue their investments in new wind farm construction in the U.S. “), and under Bush wind power installations doubled in only the past 2 years. The Bush administration has been a very supportive administration for wind energy and other clean energy sources, or they wouldnt have been able to tout the claims they have.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state?”

    Correct. Bush has presided over many millions in subsidies for wind power (“After nearly a year of anticipation and uncertainty, Congress approved a one-year extension of the federal wind energy production tax credit (PTC), which enables utilities, wind energy developers and manufacturers to continue their investments in new wind farm construction in the U.S. “), and under Bush wind power installations doubled in only the past 2 years. The Bush administration has been a very supportive administration for wind energy and other clean energy sources, or they wouldnt have been able to tout the claims they have.

  • http://travismonitor.blogspot.com Travis Monitor

    “Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state?”

    Correct. Bush has presided over many millions in subsidies for wind power (“After nearly a year of anticipation and uncertainty, Congress approved a one-year extension of the federal wind energy production tax credit (PTC), which enables utilities, wind energy developers and manufacturers to continue their investments in new wind farm construction in the U.S. “), and under Bush wind power installations doubled in only the past 2 years. The Bush administration has been a very supportive administration for wind energy and other clean energy sources, or they wouldnt have been able to tout the claims they have.

  • Brent

    John,

    Thanks for the stats. I still think a more accurate picture is painted if we don’t bunch electricity and oil so tightly. Relating the two is really just a catchy way to correlate something that stirs up positive feelings (wind power) with something that brings up negative emotions (oil/foreign oil/energy dependence). And it’s not like adding wind power, in this case, will actually decrease the need for oil-fueled (typically peaking) units.

    Thanks

  • Brent

    John,

    Thanks for the stats. I still think a more accurate picture is painted if we don’t bunch electricity and oil so tightly. Relating the two is really just a catchy way to correlate something that stirs up positive feelings (wind power) with something that brings up negative emotions (oil/foreign oil/energy dependence). And it’s not like adding wind power, in this case, will actually decrease the need for oil-fueled (typically peaking) units.

    Thanks

  • Rif

    @Steve

    It is great that US makes progress, this is what US and the world needs.

    However Steve, you need a reality check, the energy consumption of US is 6x that of Germany, so US has to do far more to get on par. I am looking forward to see this progressing in the coming years.

    Comparing US to EU, that is more to scale, you should always factor in size and energy consumption. I invite you to start reading the wind power status reports.

    Installed capacity end 2007

    http://www.gwec.net/fileadmin/documents/test2/gwec-08-update-HR-14a.png

    http://www.gwec.net/index.php?id=90

  • Rif

    @Steve

    It is great that US makes progress, this is what US and the world needs.

    However Steve, you need a reality check, the energy consumption of US is 6x that of Germany, so US has to do far more to get on par. I am looking forward to see this progressing in the coming years.

    Comparing US to EU, that is more to scale, you should always factor in size and energy consumption. I invite you to start reading the wind power status reports.

    Installed capacity end 2007

    http://www.gwec.net/fileadmin/documents/test2/gwec-08-update-HR-14a.png

    http://www.gwec.net/index.php?id=90

  • Rif

    @Steve

    It is great that US makes progress, this is what US and the world needs.

    However Steve, you need a reality check, the energy consumption of US is 6x that of Germany, so US has to do far more to get on par. I am looking forward to see this progressing in the coming years.

    Comparing US to EU, that is more to scale, you should always factor in size and energy consumption. I invite you to start reading the wind power status reports.

    Installed capacity end 2007

    http://www.gwec.net/fileadmin/documents/test2/gwec-08-update-HR-14a.png

    http://www.gwec.net/index.php?id=90

  • Doug

    But what about the birds, we are killing all the birds! Sorry could not help myself. I hope this trend continues and that new turbine technology allows us to take advantage of urban wind areas.

  • Doug

    But what about the birds, we are killing all the birds! Sorry could not help myself. I hope this trend continues and that new turbine technology allows us to take advantage of urban wind areas.

  • John

    Brent, as mentioned above to Laura, we do use diesel and various fuel oils to power heat and electricity generating plants throughout the U.S.

    Please see:

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epa/epat4p1.html

    There is a state by state breakdown somewhere of the different power sources, I will try to find it to share with all. I know I was suprised that my own state, Florida, still getaround 11% of its energy from fuel oil when we have 3 nuclear facilities and a host of Natural gas plants.

  • John

    Brent, as mentioned above to Laura, we do use diesel and various fuel oils to power heat and electricity generating plants throughout the U.S.

    Please see:

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epa/epat4p1.html

    There is a state by state breakdown somewhere of the different power sources, I will try to find it to share with all. I know I was suprised that my own state, Florida, still getaround 11% of its energy from fuel oil when we have 3 nuclear facilities and a host of Natural gas plants.

  • John

    Brent, as mentioned above to Laura, we do use diesel and various fuel oils to power heat and electricity generating plants throughout the U.S.

    Please see:

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epa/epat4p1.html

    There is a state by state breakdown somewhere of the different power sources, I will try to find it to share with all. I know I was suprised that my own state, Florida, still getaround 11% of its energy from fuel oil when we have 3 nuclear facilities and a host of Natural gas plants.

  • John

    Laura, many states use fuel oil to power small, localized generating stations, with many states having at least 10% of their energy needs derived from such. Natural gas and fuel oil is slightly less polluting than coal, but costs more in fuel and initial cost to build. So the articles quote is applicable.

    I also find the “The current administration” line humorous…as if he is “He who shall not be named”. Bush may be many things, but anti-wind is NOT one of them. Federal funding for solar and wind subsidies/research are higher than all previous administrations combined. While we can definitely use MORE funding and subsidies, Bush was not a slouch on alternative energy funding and getting the ball rolling. A slouch on enviromental protection, maybe, but that is a completely different issue.

    What is suprising is that small scale wind and solar generting capacity is similar in cost, but wind is taking off while solar, which has a much broader range of areas where it can be used, is still seen as “too expensive.”

  • John

    Laura, many states use fuel oil to power small, localized generating stations, with many states having at least 10% of their energy needs derived from such. Natural gas and fuel oil is slightly less polluting than coal, but costs more in fuel and initial cost to build. So the articles quote is applicable.

    I also find the “The current administration” line humorous…as if he is “He who shall not be named”. Bush may be many things, but anti-wind is NOT one of them. Federal funding for solar and wind subsidies/research are higher than all previous administrations combined. While we can definitely use MORE funding and subsidies, Bush was not a slouch on alternative energy funding and getting the ball rolling. A slouch on enviromental protection, maybe, but that is a completely different issue.

    What is suprising is that small scale wind and solar generting capacity is similar in cost, but wind is taking off while solar, which has a much broader range of areas where it can be used, is still seen as “too expensive.”

  • John

    Laura, many states use fuel oil to power small, localized generating stations, with many states having at least 10% of their energy needs derived from such. Natural gas and fuel oil is slightly less polluting than coal, but costs more in fuel and initial cost to build. So the articles quote is applicable.

    I also find the “The current administration” line humorous…as if he is “He who shall not be named”. Bush may be many things, but anti-wind is NOT one of them. Federal funding for solar and wind subsidies/research are higher than all previous administrations combined. While we can definitely use MORE funding and subsidies, Bush was not a slouch on alternative energy funding and getting the ball rolling. A slouch on enviromental protection, maybe, but that is a completely different issue.

    What is suprising is that small scale wind and solar generting capacity is similar in cost, but wind is taking off while solar, which has a much broader range of areas where it can be used, is still seen as “too expensive.”

  • Brent

    “The United States has overtaken Germany to become the largest producer of wind energy in the world, generating enough capacity to eliminate the burning of 91 million barrels of oil per year.”

    We should get out of the habit of confusing transportation fuels and electricity sources. We don’t use oil to produce electricity (on any real measurable scale) so wind turbines don’t really replace any oil. Until enough electric cars pull the equivalent of “91 million barrels of oil” from the grid, we are doing a disservice by misleading people with these strange comparisons.

  • Brent

    “The United States has overtaken Germany to become the largest producer of wind energy in the world, generating enough capacity to eliminate the burning of 91 million barrels of oil per year.”

    We should get out of the habit of confusing transportation fuels and electricity sources. We don’t use oil to produce electricity (on any real measurable scale) so wind turbines don’t really replace any oil. Until enough electric cars pull the equivalent of “91 million barrels of oil” from the grid, we are doing a disservice by misleading people with these strange comparisons.

  • Laura McFall

    Help me understand how wind energy saves oil. We don’t generate electricity with oil, so where do the savings come in?

    Laura

  • Laura McFall

    Help me understand how wind energy saves oil. We don’t generate electricity with oil, so where do the savings come in?

    Laura

  • Laura McFall

    Help me understand how wind energy saves oil. We don’t generate electricity with oil, so where do the savings come in?

    Laura

  • JRS

    So…if the windmills are ugly wouldn’t it be a good idea for someone to invent some kind of camoflage the “is” pleasing to the eye? It could be presented as a national contest. I’ll bet you would get a “lot” of great ideas.

  • Synergy

    Sebastian,

    It is not cost effective to put one at every house. You need enough wind speed to generate electricity. Also they do make noise which is why they are better for a windy plain.

  • Synergy

    Sebastian,

    It is not cost effective to put one at every house. You need enough wind speed to generate electricity. Also they do make noise which is why they are better for a windy plain.

  • Synergy

    Sebastian,

    It is not cost effective to put one at every house. You need enough wind speed to generate electricity. Also they do make noise which is why they are better for a windy plain.

  • Gene

    The same people who think modern windmills are ugly pay good money to go see the old ones in Holland. Remember the geniuses who in 1889 said the Eiffel tower was an eyesore.

  • Gene

    The same people who think modern windmills are ugly pay good money to go see the old ones in Holland. Remember the geniuses who in 1889 said the Eiffel tower was an eyesore.

  • Gene

    The same people who think modern windmills are ugly pay good money to go see the old ones in Holland. Remember the geniuses who in 1889 said the Eiffel tower was an eyesore.

  • Jason

    @Jim: The Midwest used to almost entirely consist of trees and now is predominantly corn and soybean. Adding turbines for wind power pales in comparison to the farmland conversion that has already taken place in the region.

  • Jason

    @Jim: The Midwest used to almost entirely consist of trees and now is predominantly corn and soybean. Adding turbines for wind power pales in comparison to the farmland conversion that has already taken place in the region.

  • Sebastian

    Maybe it’s just me, but would it not make more sense to integrate wind turbines into our society further by having one at every house? Or maybe one for every five houses, or something, i’m not familiar with how much electricity they can produce. Cost aside, that just seems like a pretty smart idea to me.

  • Sebastian

    Maybe it’s just me, but would it not make more sense to integrate wind turbines into our society further by having one at every house? Or maybe one for every five houses, or something, i’m not familiar with how much electricity they can produce. Cost aside, that just seems like a pretty smart idea to me.

  • Sebastian

    Maybe it’s just me, but would it not make more sense to integrate wind turbines into our society further by having one at every house? Or maybe one for every five houses, or something, i’m not familiar with how much electricity they can produce. Cost aside, that just seems like a pretty smart idea to me.

  • http://myinfomatrix.com Pavan K

    Progress in the UK is also beginning to build momentum. Seems the time is right for some healthy competition between our nations to keep this moving.

    I think they are more beautiful to look at than the smog over Delhi, at least.

  • http://myinfomatrix.com Pavan K

    Progress in the UK is also beginning to build momentum. Seems the time is right for some healthy competition between our nations to keep this moving.

    I think they are more beautiful to look at than the smog over Delhi, at least.

  • http://myinfomatrix.com Pavan K

    Progress in the UK is also beginning to build momentum. Seems the time is right for some healthy competition between our nations to keep this moving.

    I think they are more beautiful to look at than the smog over Delhi, at least.

  • CouchCoahd

    Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.

  • CouchCoahd

    Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.

  • CouchCoahd

    Is this a census figure or operational figure. My understanding is that most of the units in Central & West Texas are not hooked up to the grid because the turbines came before the infrastructure.

  • Starboard

    I agree with Bull. Texas has installed over 6,000 MW of wind and the Texas PUC has approved the construction of 18,000 MW of additional transmission projects to maintain the wind buildout in Texas going forward. The sitting Federal Government has established incentives (subsidies) to promote wind energy development (the 1.9c/kwh production tax credit and accelerated depreciation on investments). It appears that these incentives are working just fine in Texas.

  • Starboard

    I agree with Bull. Texas has installed over 6,000 MW of wind and the Texas PUC has approved the construction of 18,000 MW of additional transmission projects to maintain the wind buildout in Texas going forward. The sitting Federal Government has established incentives (subsidies) to promote wind energy development (the 1.9c/kwh production tax credit and accelerated depreciation on investments). It appears that these incentives are working just fine in Texas.

  • Starboard

    I agree with Bull. Texas has installed over 6,000 MW of wind and the Texas PUC has approved the construction of 18,000 MW of additional transmission projects to maintain the wind buildout in Texas going forward. The sitting Federal Government has established incentives (subsidies) to promote wind energy development (the 1.9c/kwh production tax credit and accelerated depreciation on investments). It appears that these incentives are working just fine in Texas.

  • chad faaborg

    i just came back to southwest iowa for the holidays (1st time back in years). i was pleasantly surprised to see these massive wind turbines erected all over the farm lands.

    while “jim” doesn’t seem to like them, i think they’re really cool. i like seeing the contrast of new innovation cropping up next to the old farmlands.

    and jim…if you want to see the prairies as lewis & clark did….you’re gonna have to get rid of the corn, soybeans, & wheat fields….along w/ all of the barns & tractors as well.

  • chad faaborg

    i just came back to southwest iowa for the holidays (1st time back in years). i was pleasantly surprised to see these massive wind turbines erected all over the farm lands.

    while “jim” doesn’t seem to like them, i think they’re really cool. i like seeing the contrast of new innovation cropping up next to the old farmlands.

    and jim…if you want to see the prairies as lewis & clark did….you’re gonna have to get rid of the corn, soybeans, & wheat fields….along w/ all of the barns & tractors as well.

  • Steve

    A superb milestone! Don’t listen to the whiners about “wind power per capita”–it’s a relatively meaningless statistic in this context.

    The US will grow into the primary world leader in renewables, *probably* with China or perhaps the EU in second place.

    This is great progress.

  • Steve

    A superb milestone! Don’t listen to the whiners about “wind power per capita”–it’s a relatively meaningless statistic in this context.

    The US will grow into the primary world leader in renewables, *probably* with China or perhaps the EU in second place.

    This is great progress.

  • Steve

    A superb milestone! Don’t listen to the whiners about “wind power per capita”–it’s a relatively meaningless statistic in this context.

    The US will grow into the primary world leader in renewables, *probably* with China or perhaps the EU in second place.

    This is great progress.

  • Mike

    I think they are pleasant to look at.

  • Mike

    I think they are pleasant to look at.

  • Tim in upstate NY

    @Jim: So what’s your plan, then? “Wind power bad, —- good!” Please fill in the blank.

  • Tim in upstate NY

    @Jim: So what’s your plan, then? “Wind power bad, —- good!” Please fill in the blank.

  • Tim in upstate NY

    @Jim: So what’s your plan, then? “Wind power bad, —- good!” Please fill in the blank.

  • Tired Of the Bull

    Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state? Why don’t you have your articles only printed in the yellow rag papers like the NY Times that can not let a few facts interfer with a good story.

  • Tired Of the Bull

    Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state? Why don’t you have your articles only printed in the yellow rag papers like the NY Times that can not let a few facts interfer with a good story.

  • Tired Of the Bull

    Why did you have to insert a huge lie right in the middle of an otherwise informative article? It is NOT true that the current administrative is not supportive of wind power…do you think it is an accident that the state with the largest amount of wind turbines in use is the President’s home state? Why don’t you have your articles only printed in the yellow rag papers like the NY Times that can not let a few facts interfer with a good story.

  • http://www.heartburnscures.com/salesindex Jim

    The windmills are causing a tremendous amount of visual pollution across the praries of America. They are ugly to look at. Perfer the way Lewis and Clark saw the wilds of the West.

    No more windmills

    Windmills provide energy to the energy hogs of the Northeast and large cities. They are polluting wild America with ugly junk. Only an idiot would think they are pleasant to look at.

  • http://www.heartburnscures.com/salesindex Jim

    The windmills are causing a tremendous amount of visual pollution across the praries of America. They are ugly to look at. Perfer the way Lewis and Clark saw the wilds of the West.

    No more windmills

    Windmills provide energy to the energy hogs of the Northeast and large cities. They are polluting wild America with ugly junk. Only an idiot would think they are pleasant to look at.

  • John Dwyer

    Although this is great news consider that energy consumption in the U.S based on 2006 data is 6.83 times that of Germany. (99.856 quadrillion btu’s vs. 14.629 for Germany).

    See http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/international/energyconsumption.html

  • John Dwyer

    Although this is great news consider that energy consumption in the U.S based on 2006 data is 6.83 times that of Germany. (99.856 quadrillion btu’s vs. 14.629 for Germany).

    See http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/international/energyconsumption.html

  • John Dwyer

    Although this is great news consider that energy consumption in the U.S based on 2006 data is 6.83 times that of Germany. (99.856 quadrillion btu’s vs. 14.629 for Germany).

    See http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/international/energyconsumption.html

  • http://globalpatriot.com Global Patriot

    While it’s true that we still lag in the area of per capita generation, I am encouraged that we have established a strong foothold in the area of wind power that will only expand at an even faster pace under the new administration.

    What we need to keep in mind is that it is vital to build the infrastructure for our long term benefit, regardless what may happen to oil prices in the short term.

  • http://globalpatriot.com Global Patriot

    While it’s true that we still lag in the area of per capita generation, I am encouraged that we have established a strong foothold in the area of wind power that will only expand at an even faster pace under the new administration.

    What we need to keep in mind is that it is vital to build the infrastructure for our long term benefit, regardless what may happen to oil prices in the short term.

  • http://www.wholesaleclothingblog.com yosef martin

    Agree with Rif, Anyway though, its an achivment.

  • http://www.wholesaleclothingblog.com yosef martin

    Agree with Rif, Anyway though, its an achivment.

  • http://www.wholesaleclothingblog.com yosef martin

    Agree with Rif, Anyway though, its an achivment.

  • Anders Lund

    I agree with Rif.

    I live in Denmark and we already have 20% of our power covered by wind energy.

    But I’m glad that they are ahead of the plans! :)

  • Anders Lund

    I agree with Rif.

    I live in Denmark and we already have 20% of our power covered by wind energy.

    But I’m glad that they are ahead of the plans! :)

  • http://padmapper.com Eric

    We may be getting a more sympathetic leader, but plummeting demand for energy and therefore plummeting energy prices, combined with the pressing concerns of a new recession likely means that alternative energy isn’t going to see much of the spotlight or spending over the next few years. It’s simply not cost effective compared to traditional fuels at 1999 prices.

    But I really hope I’m wrong.

  • http://padmapper.com Eric

    We may be getting a more sympathetic leader, but plummeting demand for energy and therefore plummeting energy prices, combined with the pressing concerns of a new recession likely means that alternative energy isn’t going to see much of the spotlight or spending over the next few years. It’s simply not cost effective compared to traditional fuels at 1999 prices.

    But I really hope I’m wrong.

  • Noone

    @Rif, its more than that.

    USA electricity consumption is x7 of DE.

  • Noone

    @Rif, its more than that.

    USA electricity consumption is x7 of DE.

  • Rif

    Congratulation to US for overtaking DE. Considering that US population is more than 3x DE I would say it was about time that happened.

    I now look forward to see US wind turbine capacity to overtake DE on a per capita basis.

  • Rif

    Congratulation to US for overtaking DE. Considering that US population is more than 3x DE I would say it was about time that happened.

    I now look forward to see US wind turbine capacity to overtake DE on a per capita basis.

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