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Published on August 15th, 2008 | by Timothy B. Hurst

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Vestas to Test World's Longest Turbine Blades

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August 15th, 2008 by
 

Doesn’t it seem fitting that Vestas Wind Systems, the world’s largest manufacturer of wind turbines, should be the maker of the world’s largest wind turbine?  Well, they’re not – at least not yet. Today, Vestas revealed plans (pdf) for a new research and development center on the Isle of Wight (UK) that will test what company officials are calling “the world’s longest turbine” blades.

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While Vestas did not say exactly how long the new prototype turbine blade will be, their largest turbine currently in production, the V-90, has blades that measure 44 meters in length. The largest wind turbine currently in operation is the 6MW Enercon E-126, which has a rotor diameter of 126 meters (413 ft).

The new development center will accompany an existing Vestas plant on the Isle of Wight that has produced turbine blades since 2000. The new facility is expected to become operational in 2010.

Vestas second quarter net profit rose 27% to 65 million euros ($96 million) as revenue rose 2.5% to 1.09 billion euros.

Other Posts on the Wind Energy Industry:

Photo: Hurst

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About the Author

is the founder of ecopolitology and the executive editor at LiveOAK Media, a media network about the politics of energy and the environment, green business, cleantech, and green living. When not reading, writing, thinking or talking about environmental politics with anyone who will listen, Tim spends his time skiing in Colorado's high country, hiking with his dog, and getting dirty in his vegetable garden.



  • Wilpost

    Vestas V-90 means 90 meter diameter rotor; about 300 ft
    Vestas V-112 means 112 meter diameter rotor; about 373 ft

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  • http://boksiora.googlepages.com/home2?117430892 web

    While Vestas did not say exactly how long the new prototype turbine blade will be, their largest turbine currently in production, the V-90, has blades that measure 44 meters in length. The largest wind turbine currently in operation is the 6MW Enercon E-126, which has a rotor diameter of 126 meters (413 ft).

  • http://boksiora.googlepages.com/home2?117430892 web

    While Vestas did not say exactly how long the new prototype turbine blade will be, their largest turbine currently in production, the V-90, has blades that measure 44 meters in length. The largest wind turbine currently in operation is the 6MW Enercon E-126, which has a rotor diameter of 126 meters (413 ft).

  • http://macgecko.blogspot.com/ Greg

    Hi Tim, Ive been doing a lot of reading on the matter and it seems that the bigger blades produce more energy and because the rotate slower are not a harmful to birds.

  • http://macgecko.blogspot.com/ Greg

    Hi Tim, Ive been doing a lot of reading on the matter and it seems that the bigger blades produce more energy and because the rotate slower are not a harmful to birds.

  • Pingback: Vestas to Test World

  • JC

    The larger blades move slower in relation to wind speed and power output. Basically, they have more torque which can be easier to convert into higher RPMs via some gearboxes. Smaller blades cannot push the gearboxes to as high speeds.

    Studies have shown that the larger blades, along with being cheaper per watt, also are way less likely to injure birds/wildlife.

    So, it’s cheaper, and even more environmentally sound to use them where you can. Yes, at some point it would rock to be able to co-operatively own them, but the tech needs to be built up to the proper point before we can really get to doing that.

    JC

  • JC

    The larger blades move slower in relation to wind speed and power output. Basically, they have more torque which can be easier to convert into higher RPMs via some gearboxes. Smaller blades cannot push the gearboxes to as high speeds.

    Studies have shown that the larger blades, along with being cheaper per watt, also are way less likely to injure birds/wildlife.

    So, it’s cheaper, and even more environmentally sound to use them where you can. Yes, at some point it would rock to be able to co-operatively own them, but the tech needs to be built up to the proper point before we can really get to doing that.

    JC

  • mick4recycle

    dunno if my post got lost

    hope this isnt a dupe..

    the amount of energy you can potentially extract

    depends on the square of the length of the turbine

    because the surface area it presents to the wind is Pi r *squared*

    so doubling the length of a turbine quadruples the power etc

    you get much more energy per metre of length

    so bigger is always better

    and as you say – a local community can pool resources and buy a big one

  • mick4recycle

    dunno if my post got lost

    hope this isnt a dupe..

    the amount of energy you can potentially extract

    depends on the square of the length of the turbine

    because the surface area it presents to the wind is Pi r *squared*

    so doubling the length of a turbine quadruples the power etc

    you get much more energy per metre of length

    so bigger is always better

    and as you say – a local community can pool resources and buy a big one

  • David Moran

    “Storing solar energy in batteries remains costly and inefficient. But that may not be true for much longer.

    MIT researchers have discovered a way to store solar energy that could make solar power in homes a mainstream energy option and might even make power companies obsolete, at least for residential needs.”

    Just search for “MIT Hydrogen” in Google News to read about the breakthrough … could this be the big one that finally frees us from fossil fuels?

  • David Moran

    “Storing solar energy in batteries remains costly and inefficient. But that may not be true for much longer.

    MIT researchers have discovered a way to store solar energy that could make solar power in homes a mainstream energy option and might even make power companies obsolete, at least for residential needs.”

    Just search for “MIT Hydrogen” in Google News to read about the breakthrough … could this be the big one that finally frees us from fossil fuels?

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Timothy B. Hurst

    Rod,

    I think it depends who you ask. The underlying goal for many supporters of distributed renewable sources is localizing and democratizing power generation, but there are also powerful, moneyed interests that just have the goal of building more capacity, regardless of who owns it.

    With that said, I don’t think a 6MW turbine is necessarily incommensurate with a co-operative or community ownership model.

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Timothy B. Hurst

    Rod,

    I think it depends who you ask. The underlying goal for many supporters of distributed renewable sources is localizing and democratizing power generation, but there are also powerful, moneyed interests that just have the goal of building more capacity, regardless of who owns it.

    With that said, I don’t think a 6MW turbine is necessarily incommensurate with a co-operative or community ownership model.

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Rod Adams

    Tim:

    Just out of curiosity, does bigger imply better? I always thought that an underlying goal for using distributed sources like wind and solar power was to reduce dependence on huge corporations and move energy production to a more local mode.

    How do wind turbines with blades measuring more than 400 feet in diameter – which means they reach higher into the sky than a 50 story building – fit into that concept?

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Rod Adams

    Tim:

    Just out of curiosity, does bigger imply better? I always thought that an underlying goal for using distributed sources like wind and solar power was to reduce dependence on huge corporations and move energy production to a more local mode.

    How do wind turbines with blades measuring more than 400 feet in diameter – which means they reach higher into the sky than a 50 story building – fit into that concept?

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard%27s_Knob Ed

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard%27s_Knob

    I guess it didn’t show the link in the first one, sorry bout the double post.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard%27s_Knob Ed

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard%27s_Knob

    I guess it didn’t show the link in the first one, sorry bout the double post.

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