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Published on March 21st, 2008 | by Timothy B. Hurst

115

Top Five Micro Wind Turbines

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March 21st, 2008 by  

skystream 3.7, skystream, small-wind, residential wind, micro-wind-turbineThey have been around for centuries, but they are quickly becoming the darlings of the eco-friendlies and clean energy nuts. Windmills, or in this case, wind energy generators, come in all shapes and sizes.

But in actuality, how feasible and cost-effective would it be for you to integrate a small wind system at your home, cabin, or camp? It might be easier than you might think. And if the small-wind tax credit somehow holds onto its tenuous place in the farm bill, it might just be cost-effective for you to invest one that can help defray, or even eliminate your monthly electricity bill.

The economics will be different for everyone, so I am not necessarily encouraging you all to run out and buy a micro wind turbine. I will also warn you that interconnection laws vary by country, state, province, municipality, etc. So, before spending ANY money on one of these gizmos, be certain that you have an adequate wind resource, and if you are planning on connecting to the grid, that you understand the interconnection standards that apply.

Please use this information with caution: you must not cloud your judgment with mental images of backward-spinning electric meters and negative utility bills. While this is possible, you don’t want to spend all of your hard-earned money on a micro turbine that your local HOA, planning board, or zoning commission never lets you put up.

>>See: Small Wind Front and Center at Obama Inauguration

I should also note that while vertical axis wind-turbines may be the wave of the future for small-wind (especially in urban settings), there are lots of companies making big claims about their products right now, and I am not comfortable with my own knowledge of the products to include them in this listing.

1. Southwest Windpower Skystream 3.7

skystream, small-wind, wind-turbine, micro-turbineThe Skystream 3.7 is the first fully-integrated, grid-tied wind energy system designed for residential use. This “plug and play” turbine is an all-inclusive wind generator (with controls and inverter built in) designed to provide quiet, clean electricity in very low winds.

Unlike many other turbines, the Skystream 3.7 will turn downwind because it has no tail rudder to keep it facing into the wind.

Cost*: $5399 (not including tower and installation materials)

Rated Capacity: 1.9 kW continuous output, 2.6 kW peak

Startup Windspeed:8mph

Rotor: 12 feet (3.72 m); 50-325 RPM

Interconnection: Utility connected or battery charging

Alternator: Gearless, permanent magnet brushless

Voltage Output: 240 VAC (Optional 208 VAC)

Estimated Energy Production: 400 kWh/month @ 12 MPH (5.4 m/s)

(Continued on page 2)

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About the Author

is the founder of ecopolitology and the executive editor at LiveOAK Media, a media network about the politics of energy and the environment, green business, cleantech, and green living. When not reading, writing, thinking or talking about environmental politics with anyone who will listen, Tim spends his time skiing in Colorado's high country, hiking with his dog, and getting dirty in his vegetable garden.



  • Robert

    Recently I have used micro wind turbine from Forgen renewables. Forgen ventus series, They are quite cheaper and best in performance for what I bought.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PKBLDBYWRPMI7N3DTPQIZJJQTM Nuclear

    The taller the pole, more the stable electricity. People are investing 1,000s of $ on upgrades, it will be better if few of them spend on this wind mills and solar panels.

    • Bob_Wallace

      I’ve yet to see any data which shows “personal” wind turbines make sense in any but very specialized circumstances.

      I know people who are off the grid and have good wind sites, for them running their own turbine is a lot cheaper than connecting to the grid. But if the grid is close at hand I really doubt the math ever works.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Stan-Stein/1756064509 Stan Stein

    That’s absurd…….it would end up being $10k after the tower and labor and all….that’s about 2 times the cost of solar……you end up paying $25K for a 10K system if you get a decent price on solar…..with this piece of overpriced junk, it’d be about $40K…….

    • Bob_Wallace

      Depends on the site.

      I know people who live in a river canyon and have a short solar day but excellent wind. In general solar is better but there are exceptions.

      And I suspect you didn’t make it to page 3. Those are not “overpriced junk”.

  • henry up front

    thank you bob wind is the only way to go for what I need
    i want to run a nice island in the florida keys we are 18 miles out from the main land

    • Bob_Wallace

      I’d suggest you check out a couple of resources.

      First, there’s a magazine called Home Power. They’re on line as well. You’ll find a ton, several tons, of great information about setting up your own power system. From time to time they do reviews of wind turbines.

      Second, check out this site – http://www.wind-works.org/index.html

      Paul is a very knowledgeable guy. He cuts through the BS of folks who push their wind turbines and personally tests some of them. There’s a link on the page – “Small Wind”.

      And there is a lot of BS when it comes to small wind. Learn how output is measured and make sure you’ve got good turbine performance data before committing. Some people will report performance only in “best case” conditions.

      And don’t overlook solar. You’ve got a great site in the Keys and panels are pretty trouble free once you hook them up. A combination of wind and solar might be the way to go. Solar would run AC on those hot, sunny days. Having two sources should minimize your need for storage and backup.

      • henry up front

        I have learned more from you in 5 min.s than 4 years on searing on computer  will try to send you a great page that you can use for wind speed at ANY given date & place   enjoy  you can find any wind speed & track for as long as you need
        http://www.wunderground.com/fl/keys-west/KEYW.htm   thanks again  henryupfront

        • Bob_Wallace

          Let me give you a couple of places to check when making purchases. The first one, Sun Electronics, I have not done business with them but they seem to get a lot of good mentions. I did check their reputation on eBay some time back and it was quite good. And I have had some email exchanges with the staff and found them helpful.

          Sun seems to almost always have the best price on panels. They buy up a lot of factory overruns and let over product from companies that go bankrupt. They also sell wind turbines, don’t know how good their prices are.

          Also, they are in Miami which might be a help.

          http://www.sunelec.com/

          (You should do your own due diligence.)

          The company I have used for most of my stuff in the last 10+ years is Backwoods Solar. I find their prices competitive. (Although they can’t beat Sun’s price on panels.

          Nice people. Quick to get back to me when I email them a question.

          http://www.backwoodssolar.com/

          The folks at Backwoods are, I suspect, a lot more knowledgeable about actually living off the grid. The company was started by a couple who lived off the grid and ran their business off the grid for many years.

          There are likely other good places to do business. These two should give you a starting place.

  • henry up front

    when will we have a v a w t that works foe farm / small business

    • Bob_Wallace

      Right after we finish rounding up that herd of unicorns we’ve been chasing.

      People have been working on VAWTs for well over 40 years. So far no one has designed one that works well enough to justify the cost. We see people claiming that they’ve solved the problems, but so far all have drifted away and not brought something that works well to market.

      Overall, wind just doesn’t work well “small scale”. It’s fine if you’re well off the grid and have a good wind site. I know a few people who use wind and it’s great for them. They all use HAWTs.

      Basically, if you want to get a lot of return on your investment the answer is to own part of a really big turbine.

  • erkan
  • http://www.facebook.com/herlitzp Philip Herlitz

    There is a typo on number 4. It only does 500kWh/month according to manufacter’s website. Not a whopping 1500kWh/month.

    • http://cleantechnica.com/ Zachary Shahan

      Thanks. Very old post, but correcting now. :D

  • Pingback: Wind Turbine Output Boosted 30% by Breakthrough Design - CleanTechnica

  • Fhsgf

    too dear!!!!! :)

  • Pingback: Are Home Wind Turbines the Energy Source of the Future? | WV Outpost

  • Barb

    I’m ticked that now I have to pay property tax on this turbine! Plus, a tax on the energy I create. What a rip!

    • Anonymous

      Oh, suck it up Barb.

      Pay the paltry tax and help us avoid the tremendous taxes and hurt that we’ll all pay if we continue heating up this planet.

      We had something like eleven >$1 billion extreme weather events in the US this year. Just think about how much of our tax dollars went to fill those holes. Just think how many more per year if the planet continues to warm.

      • Watchinglosers

        Oh Suck it, Bob. We want a warmer planet!

  • Pingback: Top Five Micro Wind Turbines – Remix!

  • http://www.leamyelectricinc.com Leamyelectric

    Wind power does work if you know what you are doing and have the resource. If you have an avg. of 12mph winds or better you are a pretty good canidate, if not get solar.
    I own 4 micor wind turbines and 2kw of solar. It owrks fantastic for me. I also am an installer and an electrician for 24 yrs.
    http://www.leamyelectricinc.com or see me on you tube, just put in leamy electric” and you can see what i am talking about. If you are using a 12v system, that is ok but it will not power much. 24-36-48vdc is way better and so is a higher volatge turbine. There are no good options for producing real power at 12v. Just my 2 cents.

  • A420SAENZ

    ARE WINDMILLS GOOD FOR THE EARTH?

    • Anonymous

      Is your shift key stuck?

  • Dan Cook

    As a beekeeper, I agree with you about pollinators. Vertical axis turbines are definitely a much better choice and the technology we have worked with works well in low wind speeds which most of the country experiences. Unfortunately, vertical axis turbines have received an undeserved bad rap, because of a few poorly designed bad apples. We have had great success with vertical axis turbies – they are quiet, rotate slow enough for birds and bats to see so they will avoid unfortunate encounters, and they are cost effective.

  • Dan Cook

    As a beekeeper, I agree with you about pollinators. Vertical axis turbines are definitely a much better choice and the technology we have worked with works well in low wind speeds which most of the country experiences. Unfortunately, vertical axis turbines have received an undeserved bad rap, because of a few poorly designed bad apples. We have had great success with vertical axis turbies – they are quiet, rotate slow enough for birds and bats to see so they will avoid unfortunate encounters, and they are cost effective.

    • Brian

      Dan, which verticals have you used that work well?

  • Pingback: Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines — An Option for You? | CleanTechnica

  • William

     let’s see!  $20K for a windmill.  At an average on 11 cents per kilowatt hour, and wind enough at least 1/4 of the time, it will take over 40 years to justify the cost.  Warranty that long?  Get real!

  • Taylor

    I would like to start up my own business here in the high desert for mini wind farms.. How can i start one up??

  • Wally Balloo

    It pisses me off when we are called clean energy “nuts”, even in a joking way. We are, perhaps, 0.01% of the people in the country doing something which will benefit the other 99.09%.

    • Ajpaulsen2

      hahaha i think you mean 99.99%. maybe they should be calling you a “math nut”

    • Anonymous

      haha, too true :D

  • Realityrules

    These small ones make a continous beating noise. I lived by one out in the country and often jogged by another one. You could hear both of them when you were outside and one I lived a mile away from. These won’t work for in town, and you may not even like the noise yourself out in the country. Now the gigantic ones on farms are slow turners, and you can’t hear them. It’s possible the new redesigned ones don’t, but I doubt it. You need to find someone who already owns one, and check for yourself down wind.

    • Ram5865

      In my opinion, the noise these turbines make is definitely something that we can put up with, for the sake of a cleaner earth. I am sure you will agree with me that the noise levels are much better than any other fossil fuel burning power plant, barring a nuclear plant, which we have in any case seen to be so much harmful when disaster strikes.  

  • Anonymous

    On June 16 Cleantuesday Micro Wind in Paris
    Contact@cleantuesday.com

  • Starfieldgarden

    I wish you would continue to update your education in vertical axis wind turbines, and report back. I live in a rural environment, in the midst of one of the major North American fly-ways. The traditional central axis spinning wheel windmills, with the new slender blades, are nearly invisible to birds and also to bats. The bats are important pollinators and natural insect control in any area and are just being massacred by these things. The birds are also being decimated, and they have enough to deal with these days, I think.

    Please look into this alternative, as it is much safer and just as efficient as the more dangerous popular alternative. Thank you!

  • The Original Mike

    Hmm. Southwest, Southwest, Architectural wind, Southwest, Bergey. I guess 2 years ago, that was it. What about BEAWINDHOG, or Chinook? Both good choices since their redesign.

  • http://nicolasdavis.livejournal.com/ Nicolas Davis

    My problem with eco-friendly devices is that they are too expensive.

  • Philip

    I want to take a wind turbo on a camping trip. what size would I need to air-con my tent and cook with electric. Is there a pocket size for big winds like 100km per hour?

  • Doug Thayer
    • dconklin

      Apparently out of business.

  • http://www.thegoodboatshop.com/ Richard

    My sisters nabours have a wind turbine in their backyard. I was quite impressed, you can hardly hear it on a bad day. This has to be a way forward.

  • kasey james

    i think all these idea’s are really cool. Some people are finally taking action in trying to save the earth.

  • Eddie

    Reliant Energy is offering 100% Texas wind plans. This is great.

  • Dr.A.Jagadeesh

    Small Wind turbines were in operation when Electricity supply was not there in remote areas. Wind being intermittent nobody wants to invest in small wind turbines as mostly they are imported and costs exorbitantly.

    I designed a Savonius Rotor with Concentrator to increase the Wind Speed. Since power is having cubic relationship with velocity, this concentrator enhances power even in moderate winds. It costs around 300US$ and can be built locally. The output is around 250 Watts and can charge three 12V Automobile batteries in parallel.

    Dr.A.Jagadeesh, Nellore (AP), India
    Wind Energy Expert
    E-mail: anumakonda.jagadeesh@gmail.com

    • Chadrmckay

      hi what are the demotions of your design? im looking for one that is 4 inches by 6 inches max and and produce the same output.
      email me at chadrmckay@gmail.com

    • Taranath

      It is interesting to know about your design of Rotor with concentrator. Are you willing to share this design. If yes, can you send me mail to: tnshetty@gmail.com
      Regards,
      Taranath

  • http://www.familyleisure.com Link

    Up in North West Indiana, there is a huge windmill farm. It’s amazing. That was the first place I saw one of these gigantic machines!

  • Gary

    your We are as gods

    lost me as a customer.

    change the way you think

    • http://www.zacharyshahan.com Zachary Shahan

      Gary, i think the point is that we are having a dramatic effect on the planet (like the “Greek gods” of mythology past or something). plus, hope you know that this is a famous quote by a famous environmentalist who was pushing us to improve the technologies we live on

    • kendall

      I agree with Gary. I nearly left the website altogether just because of this comment on the top of the website and “in your face” approach.
      I would consider myself a Christian environmentalist. I think we need to take care of what we have been given custody of, but to say that we are gods…well that is blasphemy. Improve technology, yes. We are gods, no. Please consider removing this.

      • Starfieldgarden

        please reread the comment: it said, “we are AS gods.” this is the more esoteric equivalent of the ‘man made in god’s image’ concept that you will find in your own Bible. Please consider removing the knee jerk reaction.

      • dconklin

        >We are gods, no.

        Try reading the Bible a little closer. Jesus once asked, “Are ye not gods”? He was quoting from one of two verses in what we call the OT.

    • raisethebar

      Whats wrong with being a god?  Christians are “little Christ”.  Are we not little gods after all?  You have the power to make a difference.  Expand your perspective and really go do something.  Stop talking about it.  

  • Dr. Bruce Atwood

    Get your units correct. It is nonsense to say the output of a wind turbine is 400 kW/month. Perhaps you mean 400 kW-hr/month (for an average power output of only 548 W)

  • Glenn

    Like most products, wind turbines need to be researched and compared closley. I have installed several of the above mentioned turbines, 3.7 Skystream, for commercial apllications. We settled on this manufacturer for several reasons. First was quality and technical support, second was price and lastly was maintenance. The Skystream 3.7 had the highest quality and preformed as promised.There support staff was a pleasure to work with and thats a feather in their cap ,as far as I am concerned. They were not the cheapest we found, but they were the best value and best designed for long term use.

  • wickeddog

    It seems like none of the units are cost effective since it would take at least ten years to recoup the initial cost without factoring in repairs, inflation, and lost investment opportunities.

    • http://www.zacharyshahan.com Zachary Shahan

      10 years payback isn’t sufficient?

      i realize it may not be for everyone, but that doesn’t sound bad to me.

    • Luckycogitos

      Did you factor in inflation…

  • Pingback: Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines: The Future of Micro Wind? [w/video] – CleanTechnica: Cleantech innovation news and views

  • Pingback: New Micro-Wind Turbine Company Makes Owning Wind Power a Breeze – CleanTechnica: Cleantech innovation news and views

  • http://www.noreasterwind.com Dean

    Are you serious? You need to do your homework. Most of the units that you are describing are nothing but expensive battery chargers. Your pricing is not even close to the total cost of installing a unit.

    • Derp1718

      I like wind turbines :3

    • Heheheh121

      :3 TURBINES

  • Don

    The units kW per month is meaningless! Do you mean kWh per month? Why not publish the performance charts so we can see for ourselves what is the output with windspeed?

  • Pingback: New Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Unveiled – CleanTechnica

  • Ram Kurode

    It is wonderful. There are many applications one can thik of, perticulerly in remote places, where power is not available most of the time.

    • AY

      I wrote to tell you some more (at : name required).

      I think it is good to know how the small windmills are doing in practice, and test-reports may be a good help.

      Although, may be disappointing, a test of 11 small windmills in the Netherlands, about which a limited teport in the Dutch newspaper BN/deStem”” , on 17/3/2009, wrote,
      “windmill does delivers nothing”. Because of the price
      of the mills. They are too expensive.
      The test was done by Senter Novem, a thinktank from the ministery of economic affairs.

      They can be helpfull, if the price goes down, , or the output, the electricity produced, will be larger.

      In ten months, april 2008 – januari 2009 the best result was by the Montana turbine, 2160 Kw (about 62 % of the average yearly amount of 3500 KW used by an average Dutch family). The costs for Montana : 18.508,07 Euro.
      The cheapest, costing 4000 Eu. did 45 Kw.

      If you do it ONLY for the money (and not as a statement or for diminishing CO2) many small windmills are not the best choice.

      What can be done ?

      One possibility is, making your own windmill (with a little help from your friends). Many posibilities for help on the internet and w.w.w.

      And, keep searching for better designs with a better
      result. I shall try to find and tell you.
      [e.g. how about Mariahpower windmill (windspire ?) testresults ?]

      A third posibility may be to construct adaptations.
      When there is a long tall windmill (windspire, windside ?)
      you may put windscreens alongside, that turn with the direction of the wind.
      That you enlarges the surface of wind captured.

      !
      ! direction of wind
      V

      movement of screen in accordance
      with the direction of the wind
      /
      /
      OO/ OO = sight upon the windmill from above
      /

      More about (small) windmills later.

      P.S. If the Turby’s will still be placed in New York,
      they probably are placed much higher than on the
      testingsite of Senter Novem, and will catch more wind.

      Friendly greetings.

      Ad Christiaensen

      The Netherlands / Europe

    • ad christiaensen

      A few minutes ago I mailed a reply and got a kind of answer like :

      “duplicate, seems you already said that”

      Why is that.
      It was a message with a new content and took me some time to write.

      Ad Christiaensen

  • mdereyes

    We have to do better. Smaller scale wind power is ok as long as it does not exceed 200 feet height at 5 miles from and airport. Commercial wind power is eating up the National Airspace System, killing lower altitude and visual routes by seeking increasingly high center-hub heights. FAA will eventually weigh-in to limit size, but it is killing ground-based navigation and air traffic radar, affecting military training routes, and causing damage to migratory and local birds. Stealth-blade technology will not fix the problems. There is nothing like flying thorough a blender!
    Photovoltaic and fuel cells may be the best answers because of space and infrastructure. Ever see what happens to a commercial wind turbine when the gearbox catches fire, or slings a blade?

  • Name (required)

    Nice to see some smallscale windmill possibilities.

    May be I can add a few, among which several made in the Netherlands.

    – The POWERBALL (from Aerolift-patent. With also a design of a 10
    MW satellite wind mill)

    I’ll send you a few more, later, e.g. one made by the former firm Ecofys.

    – Another one is called the TURBY. A newspapermessage here, some time ago, did say that several would be placed upon the new
    Twin Tower building

    About 11 small windmills were(are) tested on a site in the province of Zeeland. I’ll report you about.
    ——————————————————–
    I like you neswletter very much, because you show that many
    hopefull and good working products are installed and underway , and also that the USA is not lost in the battle.

    Ad Christiaensen. The Netherlands

    • bibo

      try the rodin coil as generator

  • Sherman

    My wife and I recently bought a home in the Fort Meyers area and were seriously considering the Skystream. As it turns out, installing solar requires jumping through far fewer hoops than a wind system and it is the Sunshine State after all.

    Anyway, while doing our research we came across an article dealing with the payback period for a Skystream that should be helpful. It’s on this website: http://www.alternative-heating-info.com

    Good luck.

  • Sherman

    My wife and I recently bought a home in the Fort Meyers area and were seriously considering the Skystream. As it turns out, installing solar requires jumping through far fewer hoops than a wind system and it is the Sunshine State after all.

    Anyway, while doing our research we came across an article dealing with the payback period for a Skystream that should be helpful. It’s on this website: http://www.alternative-heating-info.com

    Good luck.

  • Eddie Downs

    The most important thing I like about wind turbine is it can produce an alternative energy and also eco-friendly. Thanks to share the information, really nice post!

  • Eddie Downs

    The most important thing I like about wind turbine is it can produce an alternative energy and also eco-friendly. Thanks to share the information, really nice post!

  • Patrick

    Hi. I noticed that the Proven turbine is not included in the list. Is there a reason for this?

  • Patrick

    Hi. I noticed that the Proven turbine is not included in the list. Is there a reason for this?

  • Pingback: Congress Passes New Small-Wind Tax Credit | ecopolitology

  • http://2windturbine.blogspot.com/2009/11/vertical-wind-turbine-cheap-solutions.html keith

    Very inspiring article. Helpful for everyone looking for a reliable micro wind turbine. Thanks.

  • http://2windturbine.blogspot.com/2009/11/vertical-wind-turbine-cheap-solutions.html keith

    Very inspiring article. Helpful for everyone looking for a reliable micro wind turbine. Thanks.

  • Susan Kraemer

    @Charles – “what size of power out put would I need to help out on my electric bill?”

    Look at your bill: see how many kwh per month your usage is now. Then see what the manufacturer lists as the expected kwh per month that each size generates.

    You can decide how much of your total usage you want to offset with a turbine.

  • Susan Kraemer

    @Charles – “what size of power out put would I need to help out on my electric bill?”

    Look at your bill: see how many kwh per month your usage is now. Then see what the manufacturer lists as the expected kwh per month that each size generates.

    You can decide how much of your total usage you want to offset with a turbine.

  • Diogenes

    There are numerous problems with Skystream. You should check this website:

    http://www.windenergytruth.com

    Educate yourself before you fall victim to this defect-riddled product. It will never pay for itself and the problems with it are numerous.

  • Diogenes

    There are numerous problems with Skystream. You should check this website:

    http://www.windenergytruth.com

    Educate yourself before you fall victim to this defect-riddled product. It will never pay for itself and the problems with it are numerous.

  • elmovittorio

    non capisco perchè cleantechnica non da la possibilità di contatare il costruttore o l’inventore per poter fare

    business

  • elmovittorio

    non capisco perchè cleantechnica non da la possibilità di contatare il costruttore o l’inventore per poter fare

    business

  • Fred

    If you’re intending on buying a Skystream 3.7, you’d better do your research on the product. I’m running across a LOT of information from numerous buyers who are NOT satisfied with their approx. $12K investment. Poor unit design, atrocious customer service, and lack of timely shipping on replacement parts are high among the list of complaints against the producer. I was seriously considering on buying one of these units until my research into the product started yielding too many customer complaints about several defects, too much downtime due to electronics failures, delamination of blades, etc.

  • Fred

    If you’re intending on buying a Skystream 3.7, you’d better do your research on the product. I’m running across a LOT of information from numerous buyers who are NOT satisfied with their approx. $12K investment. Poor unit design, atrocious customer service, and lack of timely shipping on replacement parts are high among the list of complaints against the producer. I was seriously considering on buying one of these units until my research into the product started yielding too many customer complaints about several defects, too much downtime due to electronics failures, delamination of blades, etc.

  • russ

    1. Southwest Windpower Skystream 3.7 at 400 kWh/month and 10 cents per unit returns 480.00 USD per year for an investment of 5,400 USD plus tower

    2. Southwest Windpower Air X at 38 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 45 USD per year – investment of 600 USD plus tower – a roof top unit but probably rated correctly

    3. AeroVironment Architectural Wind – no output and no return without independent confirmation – the specs given on their site are nothing

    4. Southwest Windpower Whisper 500 – 500 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 600 USD per year – investment of 7.100 USD plus tower

    5. Bergey Excel – 1500 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 1,800 USD – investment of 22,000 USD plus

    Attractive to you and I am not sure that is all the costs.

    Commercial wind – OK it fits but residential wind is not there.

  • russ

    1. Southwest Windpower Skystream 3.7 at 400 kWh/month and 10 cents per unit returns 480.00 USD per year for an investment of 5,400 USD plus tower

    2. Southwest Windpower Air X at 38 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 45 USD per year – investment of 600 USD plus tower – a roof top unit but probably rated correctly

    3. AeroVironment Architectural Wind – no output and no return without independent confirmation – the specs given on their site are nothing

    4. Southwest Windpower Whisper 500 – 500 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 600 USD per year – investment of 7.100 USD plus tower

    5. Bergey Excel – 1500 kWh/month and 10 cents – return of 1,800 USD – investment of 22,000 USD plus

    Attractive to you and I am not sure that is all the costs.

    Commercial wind – OK it fits but residential wind is not there.

  • russ

    I guess I should have read the comments first – You are right Todd Cesere – the spec given in the article is off by 3 times.

    Timothy – I am actually surprised at the other accurate numbers though. Usually the rated power is given with no explanation which makes the outputs looks unrealistically very much higher.

    About the AVX1000 – The only unit not on a tower – I seriously doubt the output – there is no way for it to be believable without independent testing. None of the reputable suppliers make any such claims for rooftop units.

  • russ

    I guess I should have read the comments first – You are right Todd Cesere – the spec given in the article is off by 3 times.

    Timothy – I am actually surprised at the other accurate numbers though. Usually the rated power is given with no explanation which makes the outputs looks unrealistically very much higher.

    About the AVX1000 – The only unit not on a tower – I seriously doubt the output – there is no way for it to be believable without independent testing. None of the reputable suppliers make any such claims for rooftop units.

  • Charles

    What about the larger blades on the turbins?

    would it b better or would it cause to rotate slower?

    and what size of power out put would I need to help out

    on my electric bill?

  • Charles

    What about the larger blades on the turbins?

    would it b better or would it cause to rotate slower?

    and what size of power out put would I need to help out

    on my electric bill?

  • Todd Cesere

    The Whisper 500 seems to have a spec that is way off (by the manufacturers own data). You list it as:

    Estimated Energy Production: 1500 KWh/month @12.5mph

    They list it as:

    Kilowatt Hours/Month: 538 kWh/mo at 12 mph (5.4 m/s)

    This seems a lot more realistic. (I wish it were the one you have!)

  • Todd Cesere

    The Whisper 500 seems to have a spec that is way off (by the manufacturers own data). You list it as:

    Estimated Energy Production: 1500 KWh/month @12.5mph

    They list it as:

    Kilowatt Hours/Month: 538 kWh/mo at 12 mph (5.4 m/s)

    This seems a lot more realistic. (I wish it were the one you have!)

  • http://www.mywindpowerhome.com The Micro Wind Turbine Guy

    Great article, one of the best I’ve seen reviewing micro wind turbines. I actually built my own turbine, but if I had the money I think I would go with the Skystream 3.7

  • http://www.mywindpowerhome.com The Micro Wind Turbine Guy

    Great article, one of the best I’ve seen reviewing micro wind turbines. I actually built my own turbine, but if I had the money I think I would go with the Skystream 3.7

  • Moses Ngumo

    A great article and very informative. I am keen in using renewable energy at my farm for an irrigation project and would like to explore the affordable “Southwest Windpower Air X” system.

  • Moses Ngumo

    A great article and very informative. I am keen in using renewable energy at my farm for an irrigation project and would like to explore the affordable “Southwest Windpower Air X” system.

  • Tracy

    I am unclear why these turbines (except the vertical) have such small blades. Don’t you want a larger blade to collect more wind? Same reasoning that would follow for a sailboat…

    Thanks. Tracy

  • Tracy

    I am unclear why these turbines (except the vertical) have such small blades. Don’t you want a larger blade to collect more wind? Same reasoning that would follow for a sailboat…

    Thanks. Tracy

  • Wally Schumann

    it’s about time that the us and the rest of the world got there head out of there ass and looked at something else we are not the last generation to be left on earth.

    wally

  • JVM

    Nit-picking, sort of – items number 1 and 2 list their energy generation in units of kw per month, which doesn’t make any sense. I’m assuming you really meant kWh per month?

  • JVM

    Nit-picking, sort of – items number 1 and 2 list their energy generation in units of kw per month, which doesn’t make any sense. I’m assuming you really meant kWh per month?

  • SC

    I wish I knew how to install that $600 one! That is something I could actually afford.

  • SC

    I wish I knew how to install that $600 one! That is something I could actually afford.

  • http://www.allsmallwindturbines.com BB

    Check http://www.allsmallwindturbines.com for a (almost) compleet overview of small wind turbines

  • http://www.allsmallwindturbines.com BB

    Check http://www.allsmallwindturbines.com for a (almost) compleet overview of small wind turbines

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Tim

    Joe- I hope I do!

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Tim

    Joe- I hope I do!

  • Joe Jaegers

    Great and informative article. I live in Buffalo, NY and we have, as a community, a desire to start manufacturing wind devices. We have (unfortunately) plent of empty manufacturing space, and different modes of transportation for finished product, even the very large ones. But for some silly reason we can’t get local government to buy off on it. Someday you may read about Buffalo as a mjor contributor to the manufacturing of wind energy devices.

  • Joe Jaegers

    Great and informative article. I live in Buffalo, NY and we have, as a community, a desire to start manufacturing wind devices. We have (unfortunately) plent of empty manufacturing space, and different modes of transportation for finished product, even the very large ones. But for some silly reason we can’t get local government to buy off on it. Someday you may read about Buffalo as a mjor contributor to the manufacturing of wind energy devices.

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